The Obsolete Gamer Show: John Robert Matz


We’re talking video game music with award-winning composer, John Robert Matz. He recently earned at GANG award for the indie game, FOSSIL ECHO and has worked on a number of games such as Artemis and Gunpoint. A lover of games both modern and classic, we personal enjoyed discussing his work on Final Fantasy Tactics.

The Obsolete Gamer Show: Chris Rickwood


We talk with award winning composer Chris Rickwood fresh off his Reddit AMA about his work on Smite. We talk with Chris about his work on Smite as well as his other work including, Orcs must die, Age of Empires Online, Metroid Prime 3 and many more and some of the games that has inspired his work.

Check out Chris’s Reddit AMA here:

You can check out more from Chris Rickwood on his official website:

Riff Racer: Paolo Conte – Max (100 bpm version)


Riff Racer (Drive Any Track) is a game similar to Beat Hazard and Audiosurf that lets you play with your music. It creates a track based on a song from your music library.

In this video I race to the 100 bpm version of Max by Paolo Conte. It’s a 1 star difficulty track. I was using the car Monaco.

Riff Racer: LazyTown – We Are Number One


Riff Racer (Drive Any Track) is a game similar to Beat Hazard and Audiosurf that lets you play with your music. It creates a track based on a song from your music library.

In this video I race to We Are Number One by LazyTown. It’s a 3 star difficulty track. I was using the car Monaco.

Riff Racer: Lynyrd Skynyrd – Free Bird (150 bpm version)


Riff Racer (Drive Any Track) is a game similar to Beat Hazard and Audiosurf that lets you play with your music. It creates a track based on a song from your music library.

In this video I race to the 150 bpm version of the Free Bird by Lynyrd Skynyrd. It’s a 3 star difficulty track. I was using the car Monaco.

The Obsolete Gamer Show: Paula Powered


Imagine being a rockstar, on stage, preforming for your fans. Now imagine using video game inspired music to do it. We sit down with the dynamic trio from Paula Powered the British-French-Digital group featuring, Sally Ann on vocals, Sylvain de St Pierre on guitar and their Amiga 1200. We discuss how they got together and what it is like preforming for gamers and non-gamers alike.

Check them out on – http://www.paulapowered.com/

The Obsolete Gamer Show: The Music of Forza 6 with Michael Nielsen and Kaveh Cohen


If you love games you’re more than likely to love video game music. This goes double it you love racing games. There is something about the sound of a good tune while racing down the countryside or on a track. What does it take to but such a score together to make an iconic soundtrack?

Forza 6 Soundtrack

With the release of the Forza Motorsport 6 video game soundtrack we sit down with composers Kaveh Cohen and Michael Nielsen who talk to us about their love of music not only for video games, but their work in television on shows such as, Wolverine and the X-Men, The Chronicle and The Science of Star Wars and films such as Avengers: Age of Ultron, Ant Man and Guardians of the Galaxy.

We talk about the ins and outs of music the fans love to hear and how each track is created specifically to hit that perfect emotional moment.

You can check out more from Michael on his official website.

You can check out more from Kaveh on his official website.

Gamer Profile: Stephen Barton

[youtube id=”qzYDrzk1xs4″ width=”633″ height=”356″]

 I don’t remember many single player games that I played around then having much replay value, they went in a cupboard or in a box once beaten once or twice – but playing other people, especially when you couldn’t see them like you could on a 2 player arcade game, was clearly the future and felt way ahead of its time. ~Stephen Barton

Stephen Barton

Name: Stephen Barton

Occupation: Composer

Company: Afterlight Inc

Favorite Classic Game: Doom

Quote: I loved 3D Monster Maze on the Spectrum ZX, but Doom really reset the bar entirely. The soundtrack was awesome (especially given the resources available), but what really got me hooked was that it was the first game I ever played involving a network. That you could be on one computer and playing someone on an entirely different computer in a different room with just a null modem cable between the two, before we even had an internet connection – that was special, and way more so than just playing something like Solitaire – it was actually walking around a virtual world with another person walking around in it, and it was unpredictable. I don’t remember many single player games that I played around then having much replay value, they went in a cupboard or in a box once beaten once or twice – but playing other people, especially when you couldn’t see them like you could on a 2 player arcade game, was clearly the future and felt way ahead of its time.

Current Project: Titanfall
Biography: 

The rising expectations of gamers for an immersive, cinematic experience outpaces
even the demands on the highest grossing blockbuster movies, and composers are part
of a group of people finding themselves as much in demand in the game industry as in
Hollywood. Music is integral to the operatic scope of major video game franchises as it is
to the movies: the latest generation of composers must move freely between these two
worlds, understanding that in both the key element is serving the story.
One of the composers in this new group is Stephen Barton, whose principal scores
include Call of Duty: Modern Warfare and the upcoming Titanfall amidst an extensive
slate of movie and television projects.
A British native who moved to Los Angeles in 2001 at the age of 19 to write additional
music for Dreamworks’ Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas, Barton worked with Harry
Gregson-Williams for seven years as a composer, programmer and orchestrator. Barton
had himself been a performer from a very early age, both as a singer and classical
pianist, but in these early years and then subsequently founding his own studio he
quickly became immersed in the technological side of music-making during a time where
electronic music moved from an influential niche to the dominant mainstream.
His personal tastes are as eclectic and omnivorous as his resume: his work in film has
coincided with a general shift from purely orchestral scores towards a palette more
representative of the music industry as a whole, requiring the composer to move,
chameleon-like, between the homegrown indie and the major blockbuster. “Wherever
there is a good story that you can be a part of telling, that’s where I like to be.”
With Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, Infinity Ward perfected a genre that had its roots in
games such as Wolfenstein 3D and Doom. Barton provided the game’s cinematic score
which fused heavy electronic elements and unusual ethnic instrumentation (such as
hurdy-gurdy and numerous wind instruments) into the traditional cinematic orchestral
score. The game went on to be one of the most successful and influential first person
shooters ever made, selling over 14 million copies.
He has recently completed the score for indie darling Patricia Clarkson’s latest film Last
Weekend, and is currently working on the music for Titanfall, the highly anticipated first
game from Respawn Entertainment, a new studio founded by Vince Zampella, Jason
West and the majority of the original members of Infinity Ward. The game is to be
released in March 2014, but has already won over 60 “Best in Show” awards at E3 2013.
Other recent projects have included Disney’s Motorcity, a series with the animation
studio Titmouse with whom he has frequently collaborated, as well as scoring James
Cameron’s Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away for Paramount Pictures. These projects join a
diverse resume of over three dozen major feature films and video games to which he
has contributed music, such as Jennifer’s Body, Sir Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven,
Tony Scott’s Déjà Vu and Man On Fire, Ben Affleck’s Gone, Baby Gone, and extensive
work on both the Chronicles of Narnia and Shrek franchises (for which he wrote a song
on the platinum-selling Shrek 2 soundtrack).

Streets of Rage 2 OST

Streets of Rage 2 OST

Streets of Rage 2 OST

So after reading through Nick’s article on Streets of Rage 2, I really got all nostalgic and went searching for my OST from the game. I remember this and Sonic 2 were the two games I played constantly on the Sega Genesis. Everything about this game is well done, but I specially love the music and wanted to share it with the OG Nation.

Streets of Rage 2 OST

Enjoy!

Little Money Avenue

S.O.R. Super Mix

Character Select

Go Straight

In the Bar

Ready Funk

Dreamer

Alien Power

Under Logic

Too Deep

Slow Moon

Wave 131

Jungle Base

Back to the Industry

Expander

Never return Alive

Max Man

Revenge of Mr. X

Stage Clear

Game Over

Good End

Go Straight Remix

In the Bar Remix

 

 

Super Mario: Bounce to This

super mario world

Most of the time a cool video we find online we will just share on our social media pages, but since this is Mario and it is so awesome we felt it deserved a place in our archives. Honestly, I am not sure how this was made or by whom besides the name below the vid, but it is quite awesome to watch and listen to so enjoy.

組曲『ニコニコ動画』  by Ryumario

Update: We got some info on this from one of our Facebook fans. If you want to know some background on this video check out the link here. Thanks to Shawn Wrenn for the info.

 

Need more Automatic Mario? Enjoy!

Final Fight-Double Impact Remixed Soundtrack

final fight double impact

Final Fight-Double Impact Remixed Soundtrack

For those who never played Final Fight Double Impact it was released for download a few years ago for XBL and PSN. Final Fight Double Impact featured HD-filtered graphics and remixed music, composed by Simon Viklund. You can download the soundtrack free.  My favorite track is Level 4-2, it’s my ringtone.

Saints Row 3 Soundtrack

Saints Row 3 Soundtrack

Saints Row 3 is a crazy ass game and one of the parts that keeps the game going with such action is the incredible soundtrack. Here is the 8-track original soundtrack for Saints Row: The Third. The soundtrack was written and produced by Malcolm Kirby Jr.

Let’s have a listen!

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 01 – Saints Row The Third

The theme song is one of the best songs in the game. It has hip hop beats which go great with the theme of gang warfare that the game is all about.

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 02 – When Good Heists Go Bad

Nice tense song. Sounds like it would be perfect for a stealth combat mission.

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 03 – The Mission Part 1

This sounds like a perfect song for a robbery or probably from something out of Shadowrun.

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 04 – The Mission Part 2

The continuation of The Mission. Such tense music is a perfect blend of rock and techno.

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 05 – Oleg And Kinzie

This one is still tense but not as action packed as the other ones. Nice change in pace.

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 06 – Killbane And The Syndicate

Now this is more like it. This one is a strong rock track with militant elements to it.

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 07 – STAG

This one makes me think of 2001: A Space Odyssey mixed with Terminator and mixed with TRON Legacy. This is the theme for STAG, the super badguys from the game.

Saints Row: The Third [Soundtrack] – 08 – End Game

This nice mellow yet strong hip hop track wraps it all up.

If you want to check out more video game soundtracks we like and share, check out the Obsolete Gamer Music Hall!

Saints Row 3 Cover

Sonic Advance: Egg Rocket Zone Remix

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Egg Rocket Zone Remix

We love video game music and remixes here at Obsolete Gamer so we want to profile some of the ones we have come across and enjoy. Today we have a cool remix from Sonic Advance. If you have a remix you love e-mail us and we might be able to profile it for you.

Sonic Advance Music

Music Info:

DOWNLOAD LINK: http://www.mediafire.com/?6s9m8d0h330it39

This remix comes from my friend’s brain (http://www.youtube.com/user/Ra2rd93 ), and it’s about a fantastic music of a fantastic videogame: “Sonic Advance”…

The original music is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shwlxgLzfAs

Super Mario Bros. Swingdance video

SuperMarioBro Swingdance

There’s no doubt that the Super Mario Bros. video game and characters have had and will always have an impact on the video game industry.

Now they are having an impact on swingdancing, and the video of the crazy dance routine has the internet buzzing.

Morgan Day and Emily Wigger put on the routine at the 2011 Camp Hollywood National Jitterbug Championship, delighting the crowd with a routine featuring music and sound effects from the classic Super Mario Bros. and Super Mario Bros. 2.  Even a temporary fail by the deejay couldn’t stop the couple from stealing the show.

Watch the video of the full routine and tell your friends.

[youtube width=”600″ height=”480″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8Dkog-pe-I[/youtube]

The Interview: 8-Bit Weapon

8-bit weapon

8-Bit Weapon

Anyone who is a fan of classic gaming has to be a fan of gaming music. Even though some of the music from the 8-bit generation was simple, often it was well done and entertaining. I think most of all the music stuck in our heads and just as we wanted to push it out, we realized it was a pretty good tune.

Meet Seth and Michelle two people who loved classic video game soundtracks so much they began creating their own music and have performed across two continents. Obsolete Gamer was lucky enough to see them live at E3 2011 and even recorded a bit.

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After the event, we had to interview them and they were kind enough to answer all our questions.

What was your first computer and what got you into using computers?

Michelle: My brother is who got me into using computers because he had a C64 and would let me play games on it.

Seth: The Commodore 64 was the first computer I could call my own. My neighbor Oscar had one and I’d spend countless hours watching him play his, especially Adventure Construction Set by EA. Hearing the music and watching the graphics etc, I had to get one. I begged my Dad to get my brother and I one and he eventually did.

What do you like more, consoles or computers?

Michelle: I grew up playing games on the C64 and the Amiga and I have the fondest memories using the computers because I would play games like Zack McCracken and the Alien Mind Benders, Maniac Mansion and Little Computer People and I still enjoy playing those types of games today.

Seth: I grew up with computers (C64/IBM/Apple II) and never owned a console myself until I got a game boy in 1992. I enjoy them both equally now, however computer’s had the best RPG’s hand’s down over consoles. Games like Wasteland, Bard’s Tale, Dragon Wars, Ultima’s etc were either unavailable or watered down/changed for their console versions.

Seth-8-Bit_Weapon

What is your favorite sound platform to work on (SID, etc)?

Michelle: I use my Game Boy because it’s the most portable.  My favorite sound is the SID though.

Seth: I love working with all the chips like an orchestra, but the Commodore 64’s SID chip will always be my favorite.

Name the top 5 musicians or musical groups that inspired you to make the music you make today!

Michelle: DEVO, Depeche Mode, Gwen Stefani, YYYs, The Doors

Seth: DEVO, Vince Clarke (Depeche mode/Yaz/Yazoo/Erasure/etc), Alan Wilder (Depeche mode/Recoil), Kraftwerk, and Jean Michel Jarre. There are also chip music composers like Dave Warhol, Martin Galway, Kennith Arnold, George “The Fatman” Sanger, and Hirokazu “Hip” Tanaka that inspire me from a chiptune perspective.

What do you think about people’s desire for all retro stuff (video games, as well as if you want to make stuff like movies such as The A-Team, G.I. Joe, Transformers, etc.)

Michelle: It’s cool that people are into the retro stuff, but it’s also making it harder to acquire items I want.

Seth: I think it’s fun, but yeah, ebay is getting more and more expensive as we compete with collectors while trying to acquire more gear! lol

Compute-Her

What was the old console or computer that you wish you had back in the day but couldn’t afford?

Michelle: My family had all of them, so I was lucky.

Seth: Amiga 500 I wanted pretty bad but I knew my family could never afford it. Now we have an Amiga 1200, so dreams do come true!

What is your favorite kind of music to sample from?

Michelle: I don’t use samples.

Seth: We don’t sample any music or sound effects. Everything you hear is from us controlling the chips of each computer or console directly with software to make original music with.

8-bit, 16-bit, 32-bit, or 64-bit and beyond… which do you like the most, and what do you like the most about it?

Michelle: 8-Bit for it’s simplicity.

Seth: 8 Bit 4 life~! It’s powerful enough to run games, graphics, and music without over doing it.

8-Bit Weapon Group

What is your favorite medium for distributing music and why?

Michelle: CD Baby because they do all of the work.

Seth: MP3 because we don’t have to make them by hand and mail them out all over the world. haha

What do you like the most about your fans?

Michelle: They are very unique people and are interesting to talk to.  They are also very supportive of my music and I really appreciate that.

Seth: Our fans our really great people! Some are fans of gaming, some are not, but they are all about the music!

You can check out their website 8-Bit Weapon and find and purchase their music here.

 

Kino One Review

Kino One
Kino One can be described, in a nutshell, as the illegitimate child of a classic single screen shoot-em-up arcade game with a late 90s bullet-hell Japanese shmup, conceived after a particularly wild night of sake drinking. This is of course a good thing. Or at least it should be considered one by most indie-minded retro gamers, that tend to appreciate both these sub-genres and the overall anime aesthetic of the game. Especially as some R-Type inspired mechanics have also been thrown into the mix.

After all, Kino One, knows and loves its audience, and doesn’t try to appeal to the casual gaming crowd. It features lovely cell-shaded graphics to appease the little Japanese loving nerd that lives inside you, excellent comic book styled cutscenes, great video game humour, an intricate scoring system, and a brilliant virtual arcade sporting some truly well remade versions of Pong, Pac-Man, Arkanoid and more.

Kino One Gameplay Screenshot 1

Despite not being incredibly original and at times feeling slightly repetitive (some stages do drag a bit), one can’t help but notice the amount of care and polish poured into the thing. It features more than enough levels, impressive end bosses, different difficulty options and even comes packed with cute faux arcade flyers. Besides, the control scheme that effortlessly lets players cloak, use smart-bombs and shoot everything in sight works like a breeze and helps Kino One become a most addictive fun little high-score chase.

Oh, and the soundtrack is quite enjoyable and definitely appropriate too.

Kino One Gameplay Screenshot

Verdict: Not the most original shmup around nor a game for everyone, but excellent fun and absolutely stuffed with content to make retro-gamers, shmup addicts and manga worshipers drool. Also very cheap.

Visit the official Kino One website to find out more, download the demo or -better yet- grab a copy of the thing.

Pomplamoose covers the Angry Bird theme

Angry-Birds-Theme-Song-Pomplamoose

So the question asked was will the Angry Birds theme replace the Super Mario Brothers theme as far as popularity in gaming and my response is God I hope not. However, the Pomplamoose cover was pretty cool so check it out.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UCm6uyzNE8[/youtube]

 

The Music Hall: Instant Remedy

Instant Remedy Logo

Instant Remedy

As some of you may know, I’m a big fan of videogame music, particularly of the retro variety. It was around… hmm, I guess 10 years ago now, that I started my collection, initially by recording MegaDrive tunes using the splendid Gens emulator, but I didn’t discover the remix community until a bit later. It was while searching for the original OutRun music that I first encountered Instant Remedy, and it opened the door to an unimaginable number of songs.

Instant Remedy is Martin Noriander (formerly Martin Andersson), a Swedish guy born in 1976, and a Commodore 64 fanatic who has spent a good deal of his time and effort remixing some of his favourte SID tunes. Now, one of my biggest embarrassments as a gamer is that I’ve never played, or indeed even used a Commodore 64 – I was always a Speccy fanboy until I moved onto consoles – so I’ve never even heard any of these famous SID creations everyone keeps raving about, but that didn’t stop my elation at hearing Magical Sound Shower, one of my all-time favourite game tunes, in an exciting new way! And so began my collection of remixed game tunes. Instant Remedy was the first and I soon discovered just how many more talented enthusiasts were up to the same sort of thing!

I’m now proud/embarrassed to admit that I have somewhere in the region of 120Gb of game music, and much of it is awesome remixes (or ‘arrangements’) of all manner of classic game soundtracks. A vast majority of them, including Instant Remedy, are done in a dance/trance style, as you might expect, and I hope to cover some of the other awesome musicians here at some point, but for now, wrap you ears around the one that started it all for me…. Instant Remedy OutRun!

Instant Remedy – Outrun Instant OC ReMix .mp3
Found at bee mp3 search engine

And if you like this track even nearly as much as I did, it might be worth you investing in some of Martin’s other Instant Remedy tracks, available here. Apparently, Martin also has a CD available featuring the same tracks (listed below with original composers in brackets), so grab a copy of that if you get the chance too!

1. Last Ninja – The Palace (by Antony Lees) 1987
2. Flimbo’s Quest (by Reyn Ouwehand) 1990
3. Comic Bakery (Extended Version) (by Martin Galway) 1986
4. International Karate (by Rob Hubbard) 1986
5. Game On (Issue 09 to 89) (by Markus Schneider) 1989
6. Ghosts ‘n Goblins (Trance Version) (by Mark Cooksey) 1986
7. IK+ (by Rob Hubbard) 1987
8. Last Ninja – The Wastelands (Club Version) (by Ben Daglish) 1987
9. Trolls (by Adam Gilmore) 1993
10. Warriors (Club Version) (by Thomas Mogensen) 1989
11. Commando (V2) (by Rob Hubbard) 1985
12. West Bank (V2) (by Fred Gray) 1986
13. Last Ninja – Wastelands (Extended Version) (by Ben Daglish) 1987
14. Comic Bakery (by Martin Galway) 1986
15. Commando (by Rob Hubbard) 1985

The Music Hall: Star Control 2 – The Precursors Remixes

Precursors Remixes - Star Control 2Anyone who’s played the awesome Star Control 2 (a.k.a. Ur-Quan Masters) will be familiar with the high quality of its audio. Not just music, but many fantastic and memorable sound effects, and hours of speech from the game’s various races too. But, yes, the music was particularly grand and has been a permanent fixture on my Cellphone/MP3 Player. Whether it’s making the long journeys across hyperspace more interesting, increasing the already prevalent feeling of fear when the pack of anonymous ships chasing you turns out to be a fleet of Kohr-Ah Maruaders intent on ‘cleansing’ you, filling you with a sense of determination as you face enemies in battle, or making you feel like a pioneering explorer as you discover new planets in the furthest corners of the galaxy, all the music in Star Control 2 is fantastically composed, atmospheric and suits the situation it’s used for perfectly.

The Precursors project is the brainchild of a Finnish gentleman by the name of Riku Nuottajärvi. He was the composer of some of the original songs from Star Control 2 itself, and he had the idea of remixing all the 69 (giggity) songs found in the game. This would of course be a lot of work, so he recruited some help from the fan community. Although many helpers came and went while the project was underway, the core group of composers would eventually become Riku, Jouni Airaksinen (also from Finland), and two Norwegian fellows called Espen Gätzschmann and Tore Aune Fjellstad (I’m guessing SC2 is popular in Scandinavia!). Between them they have remixed over 40 full-length songs, as well as various shorter tunes and ditties from the game, and as far as I know, the project is ongoing. I hope so because the results so far have been outstanding!

The remixes so far are mostly in a dance/trance/techno style, which suits the game pretty well. They are a mixture of alien race theme songs, and other songs such as the hyperspace, quasispace, battle themes, etc, and are free to download, so you have no excuse not to listen to them! Granted, neither game music or dance music are to everyone’s tastes, but those of you who enjoy either are advised to check them out. It just goes to show how dedicated the Star Control fan community is!

Click below to hear one of the remixes:

Precursors – Mycon – Rebirth .mp3
Found at bee mp3 search engine

The Precursors remixes are free to download from their homepage here.

Further fan remixes (non-Precursors ones), not to mention loads of other Star Control-related stuff, can be found at The Pages Of Now And Forever here.

Rygar OST

Rygar OST

Rygar for the Nintendo Entertainment System is considered a rough adaptation of the arcade version. However, the main character, his weapon and pretty much all the enemies are the same the gameplay itself, is quite different.

NES cover for Rygar

Released in 1987 and developed by Tecmo, Rygar was a fantasy action adventure platform game while the arcade version was more of a standard side-scroller. In the NES version you guided the main character through a number of adventures on his ultimate goal of defeating the evil King Ligar. To defeat the evil king Rygar had to travel across the world and find five Indora gods who give him the items needed to defeat the king. Each of the gods are located in a different part of the world and guarded by a boss.

This was one of those games that could cause you to break your NES, the reason being that it had no saves whatsoever. The game was pretty difficult and took a long time to beat and the only way to finish was to either sit through the whole game or pause the game and go take a break. You can imagine what happened if someone unplugged the game or the power went out.

 

 

Bionic Commando: 8-bit OST

Bionic Commando:  8-bit OST

Released in late 1988 by Capcom, Bionic Commando follows the adventures of Ladd Spencer, a super solider with a bionic arm that could fire a grappling gun allowing you to pull yourself up or swing from the ceiling. One of the funny things is he could not jump. I guess his arm was too heavy.

Bionic Commando OST

Your mission is to rescue Super Joe from the Commando game and destroy the Empires new weapon. The game was really cool not only because of the gameplay, but that you could choose which way to go and of course if you were bored you could start a fight in the neutral zone and see how long you could survive. The NES music was composed by Junko Tamiya. The soundtrack had a militaristic theme that added to this awesome game.

Earthbound OST

Earthbound OST

Original known as Mother, Earthbound was an RPG released on the Super Nintendo in 1995. Earthbound is actually the follow up sequel of Mother that was released in Japan for the Famicom gaming system in 1989.

earthbound

The music of Earthbound was composed by Keiichi Suzuki and Hirokazu Tanaka.

 

Super Mario Land: OST

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Super Mario Land: OST

Sure, it was on the original Gameboy and it was in black and white or that weird green if you will and yes, the screen would blur when you moved, but for me playing Super Mario, any Super Mario on a portable was just grand. Super Mario Land was released for the Gameboy in 1989.

Super Mario Land box Gameboy

 

This was the first Mario game on the Gameboy and featured Mario going up against a space alien named Tatanga of all people to save Princess Daisy since Peach was off playing Tennis.

The game takes place in Sarasaland and is ruled by Princess Daisy. The land is broken up into a series of kingdoms. One day the space alien Tatanga hypnotizes the princess in order to marry her. (and all the while millions of men wish they could do the opposite to their girlfriends.)

The gameplay had a similar feel in some places like jumping on most enemies and getting coins, mushrooms and the like. The differences were that the fire flower gave you a super ball that bounced off of things and could even collect coins. Another difference in gameplay was that some levels you were in a plane or a submarine and in these levels the world scrolled to the left forcing you to continue moving. You would fire continuously at enemies and at the boss; you did this to the final boss as well.

I enjoyed the game and for some reason even though the music was very simple it was memorable to me. I guess that is the way those 8-bit games did their sound effects. Take a listen and if some of these tunes get stuck in your head I apologize in advance.

 

Final Fantasy I: OST

Final Fantasy I: OST

It all began here with composer Nobuo Uematsu who created so much of the great music found in the Final Fantasy series. Fans and critics alike agree that the music in Final Fantasy has been excellent and even starting with the first one the quality of the sound was ahead of its time. The music drew you in, it was powerful when it was supposed to be and made you feel the emotion of the game.  The music could make you laugh, make you cry and drive you to kick the bad guys ass.

Final Fantasy I and II cover

How it all began

The story goes that while working in a music rental shop Uematsu was approached by a woman working in the art department at Square. At the time Uematsu didn’t consider it a career move in fact he thought of it as a part time job, a place to make a little extra cash and in the end would not last long. When he took the job Uematsu met Final Fantasy creator Hironobu Sakaguchi who asked him to compose some much for his games. In the end there were only a few requirements which included adding “battle” and “town” music, but besides that Uematsu had free reign to create the music as he saw fit and we all experienced and enjoyed the results.

What is your favorite video game theme song?

There are quite a few iconic tunes from videos games that if heard one would easily be able to identify them. Some of these songs immediately conjure up visions of the game while others may stir up a memory surrounding an event centered around gaming. However, it does one thing is certain and that is music has had a great impact in gaming.

A theme from a game like Bubble Bobble may just identify the game, it was a repetitive theme as most early game music was, but it stuck with us because the game had over 100 levels. On the other hand the theme from Zelda is more likely to bring up a specific moment in one of the games like when you first went to the dark world or when you collected all the pieces from the Tri-force. Sometimes a song can remind you of an event. Say the theme from Double Dragon, perhaps it reminds you of hanging at the local arcade with friends or the theme from Frogger reminds you of the pizza shop near your school.

As music became a larger part of gaming individual songs became fan favorites like Celes’s Theme from Final Fantasy VI or the Kelethin music from the original Everquest. Like in movies the right kind of music could set the stage for a level, a boss fight or a cut scene and if done correctly could touch a cord with fans.

Video game music became so popular fans begged for soundtracks and from there people made their own versions of their favorite songs and the remixers were born. Almost every gamer has a tune in their head from a video game (or several) that will take them back to a happier time. Some of us even take our video game music with us in our media players and cars.

Even as video games have become more advance the music still remains and important part. It doesn’t matter if it is computer generated or performed by an orchestra, the key is it fits the moment and is memorable.

This week we asked our panel:

Do you have a favorite song or theme from a video game if so what is it and why do you like it?

Chris Skaggs from Soma Games wrote:

“Still Alive” from Mirrors Edge was very catchy and attached to a really catchy game as well. But “Still Alive” from Portal was a kind of phenomenon and I’d say must go in the Hall of  Game Music Fame. I knew that song was something special when I went to a game conference and saw an auditorium of gamers singing along to the song that was being played on a 50 foot screen in Rock Band.
I’m not sure I could articulate why I (and millions of others) love that song so much but its tied somewhere to the whole experience of the game and how the song perfectly complements what I just survived.

Mathew Anderson from Petroglyphgames wrote:

The first time I heard the intro theme for Civilization IV as the world turned in the background, I almost cried… (ok, I did cry, but don’t tell anyone). Having music that perfectly fits the game’s atmosphere is actually a rare thing, but when it does happen it can really seal the deal on immersing oneself in the game.

On the flipside, nothing really beats the soundtrack to Redneck Rampage…

Jason Shankel from Stupid Fun Club wrote:

“Sweet Emotion” from Aerosmith: Revolution X.  Because music IS the weapon!

Aaron Hunter from Playtechtonics Inc wrote:

The only one that comes to mind is the Super Mario Bros. music.

Jacob Stevens from Riverman Media wrote:

Overall my favorite soundtrack is Zelda II: The Adventure of Link. As far as favorite individual song though, that would have to be the battle music from Final Fantasy IV / II U.S. Why? I love the bass line! In fact, the bass line from that song is what inspired me to start playing the bass, which is now my primary instrument.

David Warhol from Realtime Associates wrote:

I’m kind of cheating on this one.  I like C64 Pool of Radiance but I wrote it.  🙂  It’s in the style of Wagner.  You can’t go wrong with 8 bit Mario, it’s too classic.  I like the way retro influenced bands cover it too.

Susan Oleinik from Zombie Studios wrote:

Purely because of decades of Pavlov-type conditioning, I’d have to say the ‘Puzzle Solved Noise’ from Zelda… yes I’m aware it’s not a whole song…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDPT6Ehq_bI&NR=1

So what about you, what’s your song?

Gamer Culture: OverClock Remix

Overclocked Remix logo

OverClock Remix

In this new editorial series I wanted to go over different aspects of gamer culture. When video games you could play in your own home came on the scene a whole new world was created. Today there are so many different communities and groups within gaming that you could spend your entire life discovering and experiencing them. From blogs, to LAN parties to institutions dedicated to everything gaming, if you have a niche you can easily find a haven for it.

Now ever since the earliest games on the Atari as far as consoles and the Commodore as far as personal computers, music has been a very important part of the gaming experience. As gaming evolved the music did as well and entire scores were created for games performed by those self-defined as novice musicians to orchestra led presentations of music.

I personally became a fan of video game music after listing to some of the tracks from popular games such as Mega Man, Sonic the Hedgehog and Final Fantasy. In the past it was almost impossible to find the music from video games and if a soundtrack was created it was often only available in Japan.

Slowly but surely websites began to emerge that offered downloads of game music in the midi format. While it was not an exact representation of the music from the video game it at least gave fans something to keep of their own.

Later, more websites were born offering wav files of music. This was a golden age for game music fans as often the music was spot on and could be burned onto a CD. Almost at the same time specialty websites were created offering the direct sound file from a game meaning it was taken from the programing itself so it sounded exactly as it would on the game. For these files you would often need a specifically created program to play it although many created Winamp plugins so you could listen to authentic game music on your media player.

Then came something that for me personally changed the face of video game music. It started with a friend playing a song from Megaman 2 but it was slightly different with added beats and sound effects. When I asked what it was I was told it was a remix. From there I was introduced to the website Overclock Remix.

Overclock Remix was founded in 1999 and was created to showcase video game music as the art form that it is. OC Remix offers fans of video game music a place to remix and re-mastered their favorite video game music arrangements from all across the video game spectrum.  OCR showcases hundreds of re-mixers that have created thousands of remixed versions of video game music all free to download.

From there the site grew to what it is today, a place where fans, fanatics and students of video game music can go to listen, create, learn and remix video game music. You can even learn how to create remixes of your own and read the profiles of the original and remix composers.

I fell in love with this site and spent countless hours listening and downloading remixed versions of my favorite songs many that I play in my home, at the office and even in my car. OC Remix’s artists do not just take a song and make a few changes here or there. Sometimes a song is totally re-envisioned creating a completely new piece of music. These are true fans of video game music and offer it to the world free of change. In addition the remixes help preserve the essence of the original music and credit is always given to the original composer.

David “djpretzel” Lloyd is the founder of the site and after seeing many specialty music sites wanted to create a place where music from all gaming could be found so you can find music from platforms ranging from the Amiga to current systems today and everything in-between.

Music is undeniably a part of gaming culture and the remixes and mix masters from OverClock Remix have made their mark on it. If you like video game music you will love OC Remix and Obsolete Gamer recommends you check it out. They are an important part of gaming culture and gives us fans yet another outlet to enjoy our favorite past time.

Here is an arrangement of a few of my favorite OverClock Remixes.

Free Stuff: Every LucasArts Game Soundtrack In MP3

LucasArts Logo
LucasArts Logo

If you love great music from adventure games then you will want to check out this site to download the music from every single LucasArts adventure game!

They have the soundtrack to The Secret of Monkey Island, Monkey Island 2: LeChuck’s Revenge, The Curse of Monkey Island, Escape from
Monkey Island, Sam & Max Hit the Road, Day of the Tentacle, The Dig, Outlaws, Grim Fandango, Loom, Zak McKracken, Star Wars: Knights
of the Old Republic, and Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II.

Enjoy!

Super Mario RPG OST

Super Mario RPG OST

What can I say I fell in love with this game. I was always a big Mario fan and shortly before its release I got big into Final Fantasy so when I saw a Squaresoft (Square Enix now) RPG built around Super Mario Bros I had to get it and was not disappointed.

Super Mario RPG OST

The gameplay was fun keeping the humor and character of Mario and adding in the role playing and battle elements of Sqaure. The story was well done as were many of the boss battles and puzzles and the music, some of the best at the time.

Check out the Classic Gaming Profile for Super Mario RPG

As always Obsolete Gamer supports the artists and composers of our favorite video game music. Support great work by purchasing the original soundtrack.

Castlevania: Symphony of the Night OST

Castlevania: Symphony of the Night OST

Today in the music hall I’d like to share with you one of my favorite soundtracks. Castlevainia has always had good music even back to the Nintendo days. I remember many of the memorable tunes from Super Castlevania, but when SOTN was released on the Playstation I was hooked.

Castlevania Symphony of the Night OST

 

Not only was it such a great game, but it has incredibly well composed music that I still listen to today.

You can purchase the full OST here.

Game Music: A Love Affair

Mario with Rock Star Guitar
Mario with Rock Star Guitar

While working on the new music player for the website I began thinking about some of the game music that really, dare I say, moved me. These were more than background songs they were an important part of the game or the specific level or zone. The music I am talking about is the kind that stays in your head long after you stopped playing. It is the type of tune you would play in your car or music device. So allow me a moment to talk about some of my favorite video game music from the world of consoles.

Wood Carving Partita -The Library: Castlevania Symphony of The Night

Castlevania Symphony of the Night screenshot
Castlevania Symphony of the Night screenshot

Wood Carving Partita – The Library: Castlevania Symphony of The Night

All the music from SOTN was excellent and to this day I still listen to it from time to time. However, there was just something about the music when you entered the library. The classic overtones just mixed in so well with the Dracula theme. It was truly a signature theme that, to me, stood out from all the other excellent music from this first rate game.

Julia – Final Fantasy VIII

Julia – Final Fantasy VIII
Julia – Final Fantasy VIII

Julia – Final Fantasy VIII

While many fans did not believe FF8 was a worthy successor to FF7 it was well done in its own right and had quite a few memorable songs. One of my favorites was Julia. Julia Heartilly was a pianist and a love interest for the character Laguna. The song is actually a piano arrangement of the games main theme song, Eyes on Me. Maybe it is because my sister played classical piano, but I really liked this one, it set a perfect tone for the flashback and helped me to enjoy the main version even more.

Parasite Eve 2-Forbidden Power (Aya’s theme)

Parasite Eve 2 – Forbidden Power (Aya’s theme)
Parasite Eve 2 – Forbidden Power (Aya’s theme)

Parasite Eve 2 -Forbidden Power (Aya’s theme)

Not to sound like a Square fanboi but Parasite Eve was one of those great games that did not get the credit it deserved. Now I will admit that part two was not as good as the original, but I did really like the main theme remixed from the original with a harder, rock guitar beat to it. This theme mixed with the intro cinematic’s got me hyped to play.

Starfox 64 – Corneria

Starfox 64 – Corneria
Starfox 64 – Corneria

Starfox 64 – Corneria

I played this game so much that I could beat it on hard without anyone losing health or myself dying, with my eyes closed. Okay, so my eyes were open, but I owned this game and the theme music for the first stage started me off on the right track. It made you feel you were going into battle and you were going to kick some ass. Sometimes I load this one up just to play the first level, hear the music and lay some smackdown.

Sonic CD – Wacky Workbench (Past)

Sonic CD – Wacky Workbench (Past)
Sonic CD – Wacky Workbench (Past)

Sonic CD – Wacky Workbench (Past)

You know I can’t even explain why I like this theme so much but I do. There was just something about it that felt classic. Sonic CD was the best thing to come out of the Sega CD and it had some great music to boot, but this one stood out for me.

Now there are a ton of other themes I love and these don’t necessarily rank in any particular order, but they are definitely up there. Now it’s your turn. What are some of your favorite video game music themes?

Arm Cannon concert FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009

Arm Cannon Logo
Arm Cannon Logo

Arm Cannon concert FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 (filmed by Honorabili)

Last year I had the privilege of filming the concert at the FIU Yasumicon (anime convention) on July 12, 2009. Enjoy my videos of Arm Cannon performing many video game songs.

Arm Cannon 2/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 Killer Instinct

Here is their version of the theme song to Killer Instinct, the SNES fighting game.

It’s been remixed with Survivor – Eye of the Tiger.

Arm Cannon 3/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 SMB2

This is them playing one of the main songs for Super Mario Bros 2, from the NES.

Always such a funky little tune.

Arm Cannon 4/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 Rygar

Playing Rygar, from the NES.

Do you guys remember that game? I did! =P Like the Superman theme mixed in there?

Arm Cannon 5/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 Megaman X

Playing Megaman X, from the SNES.

Such great songs in all the Megaman games. They go really good when played by a rock band like Arm Cannon or Mini-Bosses.

Arm Cannon 6/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 SMW Castle

Playing Super Mario Bros. World, Castle Theme, from the SNES.

One of my favorite songs from Super Mario Bros. World 😀

Arm Cannon 7/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 Castlevania

Playing Castlevania, from the NES.

This is such an interesting version of this theme.

Arm Cannon 8/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 Metroid

Playing Metroid, from the NES.

My favorite song from Metroid. 😀

Arm Cannon 9/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 F-Zero

Playing F-Zero, from the SNES.

Like I mention in my review, I love the music of F-Zero!

Arm Cannon 10/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 Unsolved Mysteries

Although it’s not a video game, here is the theme song for the show Unsolved Mysteries.

I used to watch that show a bunch when I was a kiddo.

Arm Cannon 11/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 Megaman 2 Dr. Wiley

Playing Megaman 2, Dr. Wiley, from the NES.

This song is just meant to be played in metal. 😀

Arm Cannon 12/14 FIU Yasumicon July 12 2009 The Legend of Zelda

Playing a lot of music from The Legend of Zelda, from the NES.

Other than the Mario games, the 2nd most popular theme music for Nintendo!

***

Well folks, there you have it.

If you like Arm Cannon, be sure to check out their website at this link.

If you want to see other concerts or events or crazy crap I film or post, check out my personal youtube channel at this link.

The Video Game Music of Pippo Noviello

Pippo Noviello
Pippo Noviello

The Video Game Music of Pippo Noviello

Today, I have for you the great video game music played by my friend Pippo Noviello. Enjoy his great renditions!

The Ninja Warriors-Daddy Mulk played live by Pippo Noviello

Delta (Rob Hubbard), played live by Pippo Noviello

Videogame music live medley – played by Pippo Noviello

Turrican, The Wall

Cybernoid 2 Remix by Pippo Noviello

Outrun, Magical Sound Shower, played live by Pippo Noviello

Comic Bakery, jazz version by Pippo Noviello

Turrican 2 (Air Combat) Slap Bass on Korg PA80

The Last V8 (Rob Hubbard), played live on the really nice Fabian Del Priore remix, by Pippo Noviello

Outrun, Magical Sound Shower, played on top of the xbox version

Lightforce (Rob Hubbard), played by Pippo Noviello

Delta, Spanish Flamenco version by Pippo Noviello

Ninja Warriors – Daddy Mulk

Monty On The Run (Rob Hubbard)

Ninja Warriors, Daddy Mulk played on top of Zuntata’s 90’s concert by Pippo Noviello

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Pippo, nice work on your versions of these classic songs! Keep up the great work!

If you enjoy Pippo’s music, please subscribe to his youtube channel!

Overclocked Remix

Overclocked Remix
Overclocked Remix

Free Stuff – Overclocked Remix, home of video game remixing

Overclocked Remix is one of the best websites in the world for video game music remixes. You can find almost any game music remixed at the site. Whether you are looking for NES music or Sega Genesis or old DOS games or whatever, you will most likely find any remix on the site, usually if a remix does exist for it.

The link to Overclocked Remix is the following: http://ocremix.org/

Interview – CoLD SToRAGE (Tim Wright)

CoLD SToRAGE (Tim Wright)
Cold Storage logo

We recently interviewed one of our favorite musicians CoLD SToRAGE (Tim Wright). The following is the interviewRead More

Mirsoft.info, World of Game Music

Mirsoft logo
Mirsoft logo

Free Stuff – Mirsoft.info, World of Game Music

If you are looking for the best collection of old video game music, Mirsoft.info has what you are looking for. You will find most MOD file music for most Amiga games and early to mid 90s DOS and Windows games as well. You can also find a ton of MIDI music from games such as Doom, Duke Nukem 3D, etc.

The link to the site is the following: http://www.mirsoft.info/

The music of CoLD SToRAGE aka Tim Wright

CoLD SToRAGE aka Tim Wright
CoLD SToRAGE aka Tim Wright

http://www.coldstorage.org.uk/

Tim Wright aka CoLD SToRAGE has been a significant musical influence in the gaming world. Now… enjoy much of his music for free! Check out this link. He is mainly known for his work on the soundtrack of many of the Wipeout racing games that are classic racing games on Playstation. His intense music works well with these fast racing games.

Link to Dawn of War 2 Soundtrack

Dawn of War 2 Soundtrack Cover
Dawn of War 2 Soundtrack Cover

Free Stuff – Link to Dawn of War 2 Soundtrack

Get the free mp3s for one of the best game soundtracks for a recent game.

http://media.steampowered.com/apps/15620/dow2_soundtrack.rar

If you want to read my Dawn of War 2 review then click here.

If you want to read my Dawn of War 2 Chaos Rising review and strategy guide click here.