The Obsolete Gamer Show: Rob McCallum (Box Art – A Gaming Documentary)


Remember when there was no internet or game demo’s to find out what a game was really like? Remember when box art was really, well, art? Something someone painstakingly created and often received little to no credit for?

We talk with Rob McCallum who’s Kickstarter, Box Art – A Gaming Documentary, explores the history of video game box art and the unsung artists responsible for those images many of us remember and enjoyed.

Last time Rob was on our show we talk about his other successful Kickstarter and gaming documentary, Nintendo Quest and this time he shares more insight into his new project and why you should back it. He also tells us about how he got into the film industry and what aspiring filmmakers can do to make it in the industry.

So check out the show, let us know what you think and visit the Kickstarter page as well as the films website.

Click here for the Box Art Kickstarter

Click here for the Box Art Website

The Obsolete Gamer Show: Daryl Rodriguez and Jeanette Garcia

We sit down with the team behind the upcoming documentary on the history of Atari, World 1-1. Jeanette Garcia and Daryl Rodriguez are the creative minds behind the project and we talk about their Kickstarter campaign and all things retro gaming.

The Obsolete Gamer Show: The Jay Bartlett Show


Jay Bartlett the star of the upcoming retro gaming inspired documentary directed by Rob McCallum, Nintendo Quest, joins us on this fun and informative episode of The Obsolete Gamer show. We talk about his upcoming film, a little of what happened behind the scenes and his love of retro games and video game collecting.

Check out the official trailer for Nintendo Quest – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4icM6GKmVM

Also check out our interview with director Rob McCallum – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQhlcw6ca3I

World 1-1 Review

World 1-1 Review

World 1-1 is an amazing video game history documentary movie created by the team made up of Jeanette Garcia and Daryl Rodriguez, two awesome, young but thorough movie makers from Miami. Although World 1-1 automatically might make you think of the world start screen from Super Mario Bros., the film is actually about what I call the rise and fall of the original Atari (I would have probably called the film The Rise and Fall of Atari). The film covers the birth of video games from their origins in scientific labs, onto games being played on what at the time were time-shared supercomputers, to the creation of arcade video game machines, and onto the rise and fall of early video game consoles (video gaming at home).

world 1-1 movie poster

To say the film is thorough would be an understatement although the movie mainly focuses on arcade and console game development. Although I love this film a lot, I can criticize that it barely touches on what was going on in the home computer field, which although Nintendo saved the console gaming market (probably what World 1-2 will be about), home computers also saved video games and people’s interest in electronics and computers with great machines such as the Commodore 64, Atari computers, and later Commodore Amiga (much before IBM clones and DOS become popular).

Getting back to what makes World 1-1 so great, the film has many great interviews with not just most of the important people that worked in Atari and Activision but also many interviews by people who work in Microsoft (and other important companies) and many famous people in the video game world such as arcade specialists and many of what I consider to be experts in video game history. This movie is like entering a time machine and seeing what it was actually like to have worked at Atari. There are many great stories of crazy things that would happen or also recollections describing how many breakthroughs came about. Some of the interviews also talk about the important business decisions that took place both from the managerial perspective and how the engineers and the rest of the employees responded to such decisions. Just like everything in life all things must come to an end and the movie deals with the death of the original Atari corporation in a very classy and dignified manner.

I highly recommend you view the movie as part of what I call some of the best movies and shows in video game, internet, hacker, and computer history such as: Pirates of Silicon Valley, Micro Men, Middle Men, The King of Kong, The Social Network, TRON, Takedown, Silicon Valley, and Halt And Catch Fire. World 1-1 and those shows and movies are what I call to be essential to watch if you a true interest in video game history. Chances are that if you’re reading this you already have such an interest.

You can buy the movie directly from the creators’ website or you can even get it over at Steam.

If I have to give the movie a numerical score I would say it’s a 9.5 out of 10. Stop reading this and go watch it NOW! 🙂

Here is an interview we did with the creators from when they were trying to get the funding for the film:

Here is a further interview we did after it got funded. It talks more about the making of the film:

Profiled: Daryl Rodriguez & Jeanette Garcia

[youtube id=”Os9Uo1CAaGs” width=”633″ height=”356″]

Name: Daryl Rodriguez / Jeanette Garcia

Company: World 1-1

Profession: Independent Filmmakers

Favorite Classic Game: Metal Gear

Jeanette_Garcia_Daryl_Rodriguez_Word_1_1_FilmCourage_Kickstarter

Quote: It showed me that video games can achieve a cinematic experience.

Bio: Two filmmakers from Miami focused on creating a visual history of the video game industry.

Project: World 1-1

Kickstarter Page

Project Info: World 1-1 is the first in a documentary series on the history of video games. This chapter is about the early years including Atari and how they helped to create a new industry. It focuses on the business deals, the personalities of the pioneers, and the creations of the engineers. This documentary will be a combination of interviews, archival footage, and reflection that retells the story to a new generation that may not know the roots of their favorite hobby.

 

Get Lamp

Get Lamp

Get Lamp,  is a documentary about video games. Old video games. Mostly old video games. Mostly old video games that do not sport graphics and are not to be played on consoles. Actually and to finally get to the point, it’s a documentary about a very special kind of text-only video games: interactive fiction (or text adventures). A documentary about the most literary and rewarding form of digital gaming so far and the only genre to truly and fully challenge ones imagination and intellect.

What’s more, Get Lamp is a brilliant and quite impressive -both in scope and execution- documentary, that, carrying on with the themes of impressiveness and brilliance, also makes for a rather great movie. After (not so) extensive field testing I can actually assure you that even people who couldn’t care less about any form of interactive entertainment whatsoever, thought it was fascinating and were actually moved to give Infocom’s Planetfall a try.

Get Lamp was directed and produced by Jason Scott, the same person that was responsible for the BBS Documentary, and the same person that apparently traveled throughout the US in a quest to conduct almost a hundred interviews, that were eventually molded into the basis of the documentary. Among the interviewed, you’ll find such impressive names as Don Woods, Scott Adams, Ian Bogost, John Romero and almost everyone from Infocom, as the movie takes viewers on a mostly chronological trip through the history of interactive fiction, stopping only to focus and expand on the important bits, in what can only be described as an excellent whole. This main feature comes in interactive (something like a simple but well-implemented choose your own adventure thingy) and non-interactive flavors and covers the genesis, rise, fall and current evolution of the genre.

[youtube width=”600″ height=”480″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRhbcDzbGSU[/youtube]

But you think I’m over-reacting, don’t you? Well, I could be, though the truth is that Get Lamp is very well shot, masterfully presented and quite extensive in its coverage. It also sports some amazing production values, filling two DVDs with hours of greater and smaller features and featurettes, comes in a beautifully illustrated case (complete with a fantastic coin), features a written intro on text adventures by Scorpia, and even provides gamers with more than a few interactive fiction offerings and a variety of other digital goodies. Oh, yes, and everything is fully subtitled too.

Actually, the only thing lacking and my main gripe -both regarding the main feature and the tons of extras- is coverage of the European and generally non-US text adventure. Now, I do understand that traveling to Europe would have been far too costly, but the omission of Magnetic Scrolls, Level 9, Zenobi, Delta 4, Gilsoft and a variety of other classic publishers and developers was quite a bit disappointing, especially as Get Lamp is such an immensely enjoyable and frankly brilliant offering.

To grab your own copy of Get Lamp, simply follow this very link to its official website. Anyone ever interested in interactive fiction will simply have to own the thing.