The Obsolete Gamer Show: Aaron Varkonyi (Aliens go Homerun)


We talk with Miami native, Aaron Varkonyi, developer of, Aliens go Homerun an innovative and interesting take on the classic game, Breakout. We talk with Aaron about his game, being a developer in South Florida and his upcoming game, Wonder Wickets.

You can check out, Aliens go home run on Steam

The Obsolete Gamer Show: John Robert Matz


We’re talking video game music with award-winning composer, John Robert Matz. He recently earned at GANG award for the indie game, FOSSIL ECHO and has worked on a number of games such as Artemis and Gunpoint. A lover of games both modern and classic, we personal enjoyed discussing his work on Final Fantasy Tactics.

The Obsolete Gamer Show: Aaron Varkonyi (Aliens go Homerun)


We talk with Miami native, Aaron Varkonyi, developer of, Aliens go Homerun an innovative and interesting take on the classic game, Breakout. We talk with Aaron about his game, being a developer in South Florida and his upcoming game, Wonder Wickets.

You can check out, Aliens go home run on Steam – http://store.steampowered.com/app/514340/

The Obsolete Gamer Show: The Bloom Family (Battle for Candora)


Most gamers would be happy if they could just get parents to understand their gaming habits. In this episode, we talk with the Bloom family, Barry, Shelia, Connor, Charlie and Chandler who together created, Battle for Candora a fast-paced CCG where humanity’s last chance for survival lies in the colorful alien world of Candora.

We talk with the Bloom family on creating games and the learning experience it gives their children and what it feels like working with mom and dad on creating a video game.

You can check out Battle for Candora on iTunes

The Obsolete Gamer Show: Pedro Guerra (Good War Games)


We chat with Pedro Guerra, designer/programmer for Good War Games an indie studio based in Miami, Florida and one of many developers that was at the recent GaCuCon gamer cruise. We discuss how the cruise went, starting and being part of an indie game studio and some of his favorite games.

You don’t get the show #9: Lawsuits, Fake Kidnapping & a Dog Hadoken!


Do we as the gaming public, the customers, the people have the right to complain, critique and criticize games? The answer of course is yes, but how far can you go and what happens when a video game company (Digital Homicide) tries to retaliate with lawsuits? We bring all sorts of topics into this one from Colin Kaepernick to our experience with fans displeasure towards a game developer we previously interviewed.

Speaking of freedom, we head to Russia where a guy was arrested for playing Pokemon Go in church and faces up to 5 years in jail. Not only did this guy video tape it and post it, but word is he didn’t have kind words for the church as either. We wonder what kind of Pokemon you can catch in prison.

After that we needed some fun and being lifelong Street fighter fans we were amazed to find a video of a dog that could shoot a hadoken. I mean some people teach their dogs how to sit and roll over, but that’s for normal people, this is what a gamer would do.

Finally, since Obsolete Gamer is Miami based we started a new show feature that showcases stories highlighting the stupidity that comes out of Florida. This story features a fake kidnapping to test a boyfriend’s loyalty, what could go wrong?

Check out more from You don’t get the show here.

The Obsolete Gamer Show: Anthony Gowland – Ant Workshop (Binaries)


Sometimes you don’t find your true passion until you walk away from the corporate world and start your own business and that is what our guest Tony Gowland did. He’s had a fruitful career working for companies such as Rockstar and Activision and then founded Ant Workshop, an indie studio that is set to release their game, Binaries.

We talk with Tony about his time working on AAA titles like GTA: Chinatown Wars and Red Dead Redemption and his move to creating his own studio and about his latest game, Binaries, a unique look at the PC puzzle platformer.

Check out Binaries on Steam – http://store.steampowered.com/app/435800/

 

The Obsolete Gamer Show: War of Rights


Now they say you shouldn’t have the same act twice but as a lover of FPS games we personally thought a game set in the civil war would be pretty awesome and that is exactly what War of Rights brings to the table.

This title intends to bring the gameplay and authenticity that not only gamers would expect but Civil War reenactors as well. We talked to the team behind War of Rights about what player can expect from the game.

The kickstarter was FUNDED. If you want to check out the game’s homepage click here: https://warofrights.com/default.aspx

If you want to check out our homepage click here: http://obsoletegamer.com/

ROOT PC Gameplay

We play through the first three levels of Root the cyber espionage themed FPS game by Digital Tribe Games and Deep Fried Enterprises.

Step into the inexpensive loafers of expert hacker Edward Summerton. Roll up your sleeves, pop your collar and brew a pot of coffee, because today you’re going to breach the networks of a mysterious and powerful corporation.

During this undertaking of corporate crypto-espionage you will face many hostile programs, but your most dangerous enemy is the man who designed them. The Systems Administrator built the System from the ground up and holds immense power within the network. He will use the limitless resources at his disposal to prevent you from achieving your goal: total ROOT access to the System.

Steam Store Page: store.steampowered.com/app/393610

Website: deepfriedenterprises.com/root.html

Beyond the Game Trailer of Root

We go beyond the game trailer of Root the cyber espionage themed FPS game by Digital Tribe Games and Deep Fried Enterprises and speak to creators about what you can expect when you enter their world.

Step into the inexpensive loafers of expert hacker Edward Summerton. Roll up your sleeves, pop your collar and brew a pot of coffee, because today you’re going to breach the networks of a mysterious and powerful corporation.

During this undertaking of corporate crypto-espionage you will face many hostile programs, but your most dangerous enemy is the man who designed them. The Systems Administrator built the System from the ground up and holds immense power within the network. He will use the limitless resources at his disposal to prevent you from achieving your goal: total ROOT access to the System.

Steam Store Page: Get Root here 
WebsiteDeep Fried Enterprises

Beyond the Game Trailer of 20XX

We go beyond the game trailer of 20XX, the Mega Man X style platformer with random levels, random power-ups, permanent death, oh and multiplayer too! We spoke with Eitan Glinert, president of Fire Hose Games about what players can expect from this Roguelike game.

The Obsolete Gamer Show: The Omega Imperative

The Gamer Profile Show is back and we are talking The Omega Imperative. This retro inspired game is currently on Kickstarter and caught our attention not only because we love classic games but because of the uniqueness of combining the top down adventure of a Zelda type game with a space shoot-em up game.

We sat down with Mike Bonafede and Mike Lamark two guys who have been playing games since the Atari 2600 about their gaming background, their inspiration to get into game development as well as the challenges of getting their work out there.

Check it out and if you like what you see support their Kickstarter.

The Omega Imperative Kickstarter

The Omega Imperative on Steam Greenlight

BGT: Celestian Tales – Old North

We go Beyond the game trailer of Celestian Tales: Old North a more character and story driven turn based roleplaying game created in the traditional JRPG style. We spoke with Cipto Adiguno, Producer for Ekuator Games on the art, music and stylings of Celestian Tales: Old North and what players can expect when stepping their world.

The Gaming history of Loris Malek

President of Moon Spider Studios Loris Malek tells us about his video game background including the numerous console and computer systems and games he has owned and played. What was really interesting in this clip was when he talked about getting a NEO GEO and setting up a game testing, purchasing and sharing system in his little hometown in France.

BTG: Forts

Ever wanted to knock over someone’s sand castle or play forts as a kid and wish it was real? We go Beyond the Game trailer of Forts the action/strategy game from EarthWork Games where you do just that. Build a fort in real time, arm it with advanced weapons and take out the enemy fort.

After the trailer premiere we spoke with video game artist Nick Smith in Brisbane, Australia about the game, his gaming background and favorite classic games.

Check out the game on Steam Greenlit

Or on the main website for EarthWork Games

Inferno 2 PC Gameplay

 

Check out some gameplay footage from the retro inspired shooter, Inferno 2. Released by Radiangames it features 80 levels of gameplay where you explorer and fight your way through a maze of enemies and barriers to the end of each map.

Along the way you can upgrade and enhance your ship to take out your enemies in a number of different ways utilizing various weapons such as missiles, spread weapons and even special powers that unleash devastating attacks.

You can find more information about the game on their Steam page.

BTG: Hacknet

All the hacking, none of the jail time. We go Beyond the Game trailer of Hacknet an intriguing terminal-based game or as they call it a “hacking simulator” that uses actual UNIX commands. We spoke with Matt Trobbiani who developed the game about what players can expect when they immerse themselves in his world.

Releasing on August 12, 2015 for PC

HIGHLIGHTS:

Hacking simulation using real UNIX commands
Mysterious story to unravel
Fully immersive, it never breaks the illusion of real hacking on your PC
Minimal hand-holding, find your own path
A rich world of secrets to explore
Killer soundtrack featuring underground artists including Carpenter Brut (Hotline Miami)

Price: US $10.00

Website: Hacknet

Badass Inc. Gameplay

 

We love retro inspired games and Badass Inc. is right up our alley so when we got a look at this game we had to try out the demo. If you played any of the old school action/adventure side-scrolling games especially with a sci-fi or cyber-punk feel to it then you will really like this game. It’s fun and funny and looks great in the style and atmosphere created for you in this beautifully pixelated world. Our only gripe is that it was too short!

About Badass Inc.:

Building on 2nd place in the 32nd Ludum Dare and made with nostalgic 30 somethings in mind, Badass Inc. is a point and click action game that will take you back. You’re a contract killer; a sleek, stylish, feline predator that trades in scalps and briefcases full of cash. Your mission: eliminate a target for Ludum-Tek in an “unconventional way”.

Check out Badass Inc. for yourself and play the demo here.

BTG: Fragments of Him

We premiere the cinematic trailer for Fragments of Him, a unique and interesting first-person drama gaming experience coming to PC and Xbox. We headed out to the Netherlands to talk with Mata Haggis about what players can expect from the game.

About Fragments of Him:

Fragments of Him is a narrative-driven first-person experience that follows the aftermath of protagonist Will’s sudden death, and how the lives of those close to him are affected by this loss. Players experience memories and snapshots of four lives, including victim Will, his boyfriend, ex-girlfriend, and grandmother. Fragments of Him will come to Xbox One via the ID@Xbox self-publishing program, and PC in 2016 and is supported by funding of the Dutch Stimuleringsfonds and Gamefonds.

Platforms: Xbox One / PC
Developer: SassyBot Studio
Genre: First-Person Adventure
Price: TBA
Language: English
Release: 2016
Website: Fragments of Him

First Look: Skyhill

We take a first look at Skyhill where your goal is to stay alive and make your way out of a hotel infested with horrible mutants and terrible creatures created after a biological attack. Find weapons, food and medical supplies and create new items and upgrade existing ones to survive if you want to make it all the way down the 100 floors.

In this first look we take you through the beginning stages of the game and show you how the basics of the game works including the combat mechanics and the crafting system.

Name: Skyhill
Genre: Rogue-like/ Survival
Release: October 6th, 2015
Price: $14.99 USD

Platforms: PC, Mac, Linux
Developer: Mandragora
Publisher: Daedalic Entertainment

Steam Greenlight

Alpages: The Five Books (Early Alpha Gameplay)

 

In Alpages: The Five Books you are alone in a dark and scary countryside searching for five magical books, however as you find each book you unleash a supernatural horror that hunts you down and tries to kill you.

In this early Alpha watch me stumble across the countryside trying to find the books while being completely torn apart by the horrors I release upon myself.

Beyond the Game Trailer: A Quiver of Crows

 

We go beyond the game trailer of A Quiver of Crows, a very cool and interesting looking twin-stick shooter by indie developer, Shedo.net. We talk with lead developer Chad Ata and lead artist Danny Ata about what players can expect when they step into this Grim World Cursed by Demons and Ghouls.

Beyond the Game Trailer: Enola – Nightmare

We delve into the world of the physiological thriller as we take a look at the update for the indie game, Enola from, The Domaginarium. Before we premiered the trailer we got a chance to talk with creative director, Sergio Rosa about the game as well about one of all-time favorite horror games, Silent Hill.

About Enola:

Enola is a psychological horror/adventure game that delves into the inherent darkness of love, death and revenge. As Enola, you must survive a macabre world conjured up by the tortured memories of her love, Angelica.

Visit: Obsolete Gamer

Devolved and Published by: Domaginarium

Check it out on Steam: Here

 

Profiled: Ichiro Lambe

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Name: Ichiro Lambe 

Company: Dejobaan Games 

Title: Lead Studio Head

Elegy for a Dead World

We talked with Ichiro Lambe from Dejobaan Games their incredible game, Elegy for a Dead World where you explore dead civilizations, write about what you find, and share your stories with the world. You can find the game on Steam.

Ichiro started gaming at an earlier age and like host, J.A. Laraque even had a Texas Instruments TI 99/4A. We talked about his gaming background and his journey from gamer to game maker. So check out his episode and let us know what you think.

Super Mario Pac

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Super Mario Pac

Here is a free cool game that mixes the classic ZX Spectrum game Jetpack, Mario Sunshine and Super Mario World. In Super Mario Pac, Mario is trapped and being attacked by evil creatures, he must use his plumbing skills and the FLUDD backpack he acquired on a recent holiday to escape.

super mario pac

Control Mario, moving him left, right and water-thrusting him into the air, in order to collect and assemble his pipe escape route and poison any plants in his way. Use the FLUDD water cannon to drench the attacking enemies. Don’t forget to refill your FLUDD backpack regularly or you’ll really be in trouble!

super mario pac

So as you can see in the video you just fly around and shoot water at the turtles as you try to kill the Piranha plant, it’s that simple, but in that simplicity it’s actually fun and it’s free so why not and you get the music and graphics of Super Mario (with a bit of haze in some spots) so why not.

super mario pac

You can check out the main site and get the game here.

Dark Disciples II

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Dark Disciples II

Freeware CRPGs are less common that -say- freeware adventure and platform games, mostly due to the fact that they need to be bloody big to be any good; a simple fact that translates into tons of content, detailed mechanics and buckets of Tolkien-esque words. Enter, Dark Disciples II, the honestly named and vastly improved sequel to the original Dark Disciples.

Dark Disciples II Dark Disciples IIDark Disciples II

 

 

 

It impressively is a rather huge freeware, tile-based, non-linear RPG sporting an impressive number of quests, characters, monsters and areas, that let’s players freely explore its four continents and even come up with some interesting characters. I suggest you give it a try. I did.

Phenomenon 32

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Phenomenon 32 is an incredibly immersive experience, designed to be savored slowly and carefully. It is after all a hard and demanding game, that simply cannot be completed in one sitting.~Konstantinos Dimpoulos

Phenomenon 32

I’ve been meaning to write about Phenomenon 32 for quite some time now, but hurdle after hurdle, combined with the fact that this is an impressively vast game, shamed this very Lair to a belated coverage of the game. Still, better late than ever, eh? After all, the thing is still around, freeware as ever.

phenomenon 32

So, uhm, let’s start with some basic facts first. Phenomenon 32 was developed by Jonas Kyratzes, the immensely (multi) talented, inventive and controversial developer of The Strange and Somewhat Sinister Tale of the House at Desert Bridge and The Museum of Broken Memories, and can briefly be described as a black and white, 2D, exploration, platform game, albeit one with quirky RPG and strategy elements. The game can be downloaded here.

phenomenon 32 - PC - Indie Game - Screenshot-2

Phenomenon 32, being Kyratzes’ most ambitious project so far, is much more than the sum of its parts. Besides the beautiful black and white visuals, its atmospheric soundscape and a deeply depressing and simultaneously surreal game world, Phenomenon 32 is an incredibly immersive experience, designed to be savored slowly and carefully. It is after all a hard and demanding game, that simply cannot be completed in one sitting. It also is a game filled with surprises and little touches of excellence, that go far beyond what you might expect from a free game.

phenomenon 32 - PC - Indie Game - Screenshot-3

As for the plot, well, it’s one of the best I’ve ever encountered in a video game ever and a key part of Phenomenon 32. Set in an alternate version of the 70s the game is engrossing, deeply political, truly unique and thought-provoking, and is supported by some quality writing and impressive voice-work. You really have to play it. Really.

Dark Scavenger

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This is flash-driven game that stores its save data in your browser cache.  The game does warn you of this during start up, which is nice – but an odd design choice in my opinion. ~Nick Herber

Dark Scavenger

I will admit that this was a game I had heard nothing about, despite getting mentioned on Destructoid and winning an honorable mention at an indie games convention.  When our friends at Digitally Downloaded asked me if I wanted to review it, I said sure!  Dark Scavenger is a mesh of genres, with a sort of over-the-top sci-fi story presented in a hybrid point-and-click adventure game with a somewhat more traditional RPG combat system.

Dark Scavenger

Psydra games pulls together a mostly static, but bright and colorful art style as you move around maps and click on items that then generate events.  Sometimes you simply find a resource, sometimes you initiate a fight with something or someone, and other times you wind up with branching dialog.  Some of these dialog pieces present puzzle-like elements as well, where you can leverage items you have in your inventory.

Now, speaking of inventory, this is really where the game does most of its heavy-lifting.  Your goal as you move around from one map to another is to pick up and find resources for the rest of your motley, Dark Scavenger crew.  When you move on to a new map screen, you are given a chance to turn your resources into one of your three crew members.  That resource is then turned into a weapon, an item or an ally.
These new inventory items degrade with use – so your tRUSTY sword may run out in 7 uses, whether that be as a puzzle use or in combat.  Combat takes place with a sort of traditional enemy-facing-you approach with some limited combat animations occurring.  You can combine items and weapons in some instances, which is a big help.  My favorite was the ‘big red button’ – which then allowed your single-hit weapon to strike every enemy on screen (particularly helpful during a tougher-than-average fight with a three-headed brute late in the second chapter, for example).

Dark Scavenger

You get the usual number-crunching that takes place in this kind of combat behind the scenes.  For example, the wolf-like creature you are fighting may be vulnerable to your static gun’s electricity damage, but resistant to another type.  Or maybe your weapon and item combination can stun the creature, forcing him to forfeit an attack that round.  You do have a health bar, which can be replenished with items as well, and can be diminished by not only combat, but as a result of how you interact with certain environmental puzzles as well.
Dark Scavenger
Working through the environment itself is a pretty straightforward affair.  If you can interact with an element, your mouse will cause that element to glow with a red outline if you hover over it.  You can then left-click on it to interact.  Pretty basic, but it does the job.
This is a largely text-driven game.  There is very little in the way of animation to discuss here, and I will be honest – by the end of the game the menu-driven combat and heaps of dialog were starting to blur together.  What started relatively fresh and interesting had lost its sparkle during the last leg of my 5-ish hour session (it may not have helped that I sat there and literally played it straight through over the course of an afternoon only getting up to use the restroom or grab a soda).
Dark Scavenger
So, what did I think of the game?  It was alright.  I always have a tough time with indie games, because they are generally lower in production value (usually by a significant margin) than more polished games, and because their distribution tends to be a bit more limited (Psydra did say that Gamersgate plans to carry this title as well), they might not feel like as good of a bargain for what you get.  Dark Scavenger rings in at $10.  Given the very unique nature of this game, I would strongly suggest giving the demo (which gives you a limited taste of the first chapter) a try if you are considering purchasing, and their site can be found here.
Dark Scavenger
Scoring this game?  I’d probably say a 7/10 – it’s a decent indie effort, and I don’t feel like my time was ill-spent, but it’s not a game that’s going to overtake the Mass Effects or Final Fantasy titles I play either.

Beneath the Surface with William Volk

Beneath the Surface with William Volk

tip of the iceberg

Even if you believe you are just in gaming for the fun, you will come across all types of issues that can seriously affect the gaming industry in one way or another. Often we are too busy fighting against one another to really have a discussion about them, but as gamers get older their concerns grow as does their willingness to talk about them.

A few years ago I started an editorial series where I asked people in the gaming industry a question, some were more general like, What Game would you Teach your Child and some more topical based on current topics of note such as, Should the Government take steps to keep violent video games out of the hands of Children.

The responses and feedback from the gaming community was great and we found ourselves asking similar questions during our podcasts. With the launch of our different shows we wanted one where we could talk about important topics and not just skim along the top, but go beneath the surface to understand why this is happening, the effect of it and what, if anything, could we do about it. We wanted to cover current issues such as Downloadable Content and Free 2 Play games and current headlines such as the news about Warner Bros and  Arkham Origins.

Today we are proud to feature the first episode of Beneath the Surface where we talk one on one with professionals within the gaming and computer industry. For our first episode we sat down with the brilliant and talented William Volk, COO of PlayScreen.

We began with Free 2 Play games and the effect it has had and will have on the gaming industry. His vast knowledge of the mobile gaming market was fascinating and learning about the different markets across the world and how gambling with real money is legal and booming in the U.K. was intriguing.

We also had fun talking about current games and topics that have been in the news such as the Flappy Bird rollout, disappearance and rise of clones and of course the Candy Crush Sage and the counterattack by indie developers. Of course we talked about PlayScreen and all the games they offer on the mobile platform and we discovered his love of the game, The Last of Us and one of the bestselling mobile games, Puzzle & Dragons.

Overall it was a fun, interesting and informative discussion. I hope you will check it out and let you know what you think. Thanks to Mr. Volk for another great discussion. Stay tuned for the next episode and if you have any idea for topic or guests or would like to be a guest yourself, feel free to contact us.

You can view the show on the official show page.

Containment: The Zombie Puzzler

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Containment: The Zombie Puzzler

Do you like games wtih zombies?  Do you like puzzle games?  What if there was a game that put those two things together?  There is.  Learn more about Containment A Zombie Puzzler in this review.

Containment - The Zombie Puzzler

I recently acquired Containment A Zombie Puzzler through Indie Royale’s May Hurray Bundle.  Having heard of the game from a number of friends who are game developers as well as hearing about the game being selected for PAX 10 this year and seeing as a part of the bundle, I decided to get it.  Fast forward to July and I finally got around to playing it.

Unlike a lot of zombie games, this is not a shooter.  This is not a see how long you can survive.  This is not a run for your life, you’re going to be eaten by zombies, nor is it close to Plants vs. Zombies.  It’s a true puzzle game WITH zombies and boss zombies you have to fight.

Containment - The Zombie Puzzler

The game has two play modes:  Campaign and Survival mode.

In Campaign mode, you play through three acts which tells a story of how the zombie apocalypse started, what people are doing to survive.  The story is actually pretty entertaining and leads into new puzzles as you go on through the story.  Each act has 5 parts.  Depending on how good you are at puzzles and how fast you are at moving people around in the game will tell you how long it will take you to complete it.  The campaign will take at least 2 to 3 hours to complete.

Containment - The Zombie Puzzler

In Survival mode, you have to complete puzzles quickly.  You get rated on how many zombies are killed, time it takes to complete and how many survivors you have.  There are 3 different survival modes and you can rank up against other s in the game Leaderboard depending on how well you do.

Both versions are a lot of fun to play, but I have to say that Campaign mode gets harder and harder with new zombies and new bosses to defeat at each stage and Survival mode gets harder the further you get into the game.

Containment - The Zombie Puzzler

Did I mention that the zombies can turn your puzzle pieces into zombies?  I think I forgot to mention that.

I mentioned this was a puzzle game.  You get 4 types of non-zombies:  The Soccer Mom (as I call her) dressed in Pink, Army Dude dressed in Green. Police Officer in Blue and Anarchist in Orange.  To defeat the zombies, you have to surround on four sides (corners do not apply) with the same color.  You can surround groups of zombies.  Zombies on the edges only have to have 2 sides (sometimes three sides) before they are killed.  The colors vary each time for the fighters.  As you use them, they disappear and more fill in from the top.  Continue matching colors as you can until you defeat all the zombies.  But you have to do it quickly, otherwise the zombies will keep eating your defenders and you will run out of defenders and lose the round.

Containment - The Zombie Puzzler

You get bonus points for various events in the game, such as if you trap zombies or have a cascade effect. A cascade effect is where defenders drop down into a region and can automatically surround and kill a zombie already there.

Containment - The Zombie Puzzler

A nice feature of the game is you can restart individual blocks in an act, or the entire level.  It’s up to you.  If you fail, you get to chose where to restart as well.

Overall, as a puzzle game, this was pretty fun, especially as it tells a story.  In addition to putting puzzles together, you get bonus items to use (grenades, firebombs, airplane attack, etc.) but you also kill your people with those attacks.  There are also areas where you can interact with the environment to blow pieces of it up.

Containment - The Zombie Puzzler

There are also additional mini puzzles in the game.  For example, in one act, you need to surround several power supplies with defenders of the same color.  While defeating zombies and preventing zombies from walking into the group and turning them.   This game definitely makes you think.

The only downside of the game is the freaky repetitive noises.  The sounds get quite annoying after a while.

If you like puzzle games and zombies, this is a great game to add to your collection.  This is available on PC through Steam, as well as for iPads and other iDevices through ITunes.

For more information on Containment or on the development company, BootSnake Games, you can visit the following websites:

Game Rating: 4/5

You can also check out this video by bootsnake games  to see some gameplay:

Dead Hotel

As I am semi-randomly and very slowly going through the Interactive Competition entries, I couldn’t help but notice that Dead Hotel is the only game that has been specifically programmed to run as a proper executable for Windows using its very own engine. Out of respect for the extra and, for all I know, difficult effort I decide to give it a look. Didn’t regret it, mind.
Dead Hotel
The game itself is a menu-driven affair, not dissimilar to Snatcher (sans graphics of course), that puts gamers (or should I say interactive readers?) in the shoes of a former policeman trapped in a hotel and facing a zombie apocalypse. Rather banal, I know, but it is pretty well written, though admittedly very short and obviously not quite complete. It’s more of a demo really. A demo with some interesting and i-f compatible combat mechanics.
More importantly, it’s like a demo of something really promising. The engine, you see, sports a lovely, retro-esque, chunky font, looks fine, can support such things as hit-points, combat and inventories, is fast and already features sound. With a few modifications and additions such as maps and graphics, it could end up being able to produce something really amazing, and I’m definitely looking forward to this. Not that I didn’t enjoy the 15 minutes I spent with Dead Hotel
You can download Dead Hotel, as well as the other IF Competition games, for free over here. Actually, you really should. There are more than a few gems waiting for your attention.

Delve Deeper: Treasures and Tunnels

Delve Deeper
Delve Deeper is an excellent game. It’s smart, unique, easy on the retro-loving eye and, now that the Treasures and Tunnels DLC has been released, pretty huge too. Fresh off the indie forges of Lunar Giant and costing less than one (rapidly devaluating) dollar, Treasures and Tunnels extends the game with 10 new levels -including the brilliantly named Big Orc Candy Mountains- and 25 brand new relics; that is 50% more Delve Deeper maps, 30% more treasure and absolutely no extra fat. Oh, and apparently each level is custom-tailored to be tackled by different teams of dwarfs, whereas each new relic is designed to influence both new and old maps.
Delve Deeper
You can download Treasures and Tunnels via Steam; it does obviously require that you own Delve Deeper. As for the people still wondering what Delve Deeper is (besides -as already mentioned- excellent and a game), let me just say it’s a turn-based, strategy/RPG affair with lovely pixel-art graphics and board-game influences. Here are a couple DLC piccies to further entice you:

Dominique Vial: Domsware

domsware

Name: Dominique Vial

Company: Domsware

Position/Title: indie iOS developer

Favorite Classic game: Dungeon Master

Why is this game your favorite: The answer is not easy! But each time someone asked me this question it’s always Dungeon Master on top. I was 17 years old and I spend my days and night playing with DM with a friend: one playing and the other managing a map. My friend’s bedroom was full of DM maps pinned on the wall. We played on a cracked version of DM — sorry we were young — and from time to time there was a reset and we must start back from zero! And each tim we updated DM, the reset point was a little bit later in the game but still exits. I wonder if someone succeeded in cracking DM 100% !

We were on our final “lycée” studies and we needed to prepare THE french exam named “baccalauréat”. It’s very important to make a big score to this exam because it’s the passcard to university and High Schools. Anyway. We spend a lot of time playing DM instead of working our final exams. Locked on my friend’s bedroom, our parents believed we were working on our studies! Ah ah ah! It was a really immersive and addictive game. And, for the story purpose, a friend of my elder brother was working on some computer science laboratory on some kind of “network”. He was helping us by providing us printed listings containing the precious answers to hard DM’s issues: these was from this mysterious “network”. Later and later I found the name of this guy on a W3C document: I then understood he was one of the first working on the internet and that was the mysterious network. He was a pioneer while we were exploring dungeons !

novae

Check out his latest iOS game, Novae!

Dead Meets Lead

Dead Meets Lead
One of the reasons I don’t usually review games I haven’t particularly enjoyed is that I often can’t be bothered to properly play them, let alone take the time to actually write the review. Apparently then, Dead Meets Lead is quite an exception. I never particularly enjoyed it, didn’t play it exhaustively, yet here I am writing about it. Why? Because it does have some redeeming features, you see.
Dead Meets Lead
Dead Meets Lead is -at heart- an indie and definitely innovative arena shooter, that might not feature much shooting, but does try to make up for it by sporting both pirates and zombies. Sadly though, innovation isn’t a priori a good thing; some things haven’t been attempted for the simple reason that they just don’t work. Melee arena combat is apparently one of those ideas. Then again, things could have been better if the controls, the camera and the hits each enemy can take were balanced in a better way, but this is not the case. Enemies can take ages to defeat, more often than not the action takes place hidden behind a building or something, and the WASD-mouse combination isn’t ideal for sword-based arena shooters. Oh, and don’t get me started on the zombies that restrict your movement by ensnaring you in the most frustrating of ways…
Dead Meets Lead
To the game’s defense though one could add that by featuring a shotgun it does turn itself into a rather lovely yet more traditional arena-shooter. One would of course be only partly correct, as the ammunition for the shotgun (and the rest of the firearms that are eventually unlocked) is far too sparse and in certain levels simply absent, which is a crying shame. Shooting the zombie hordes as a cursed pirate on a bleak exotic island is immensely enjoyable and goes on to show how great Dead Meets Lead could have been; especially if it had bothered to include a few save-points in its brutally hard levels.

Sadly, as it is, all it manages is to more or less waste the potential its setting, plot, graphics, music, interesting upgrade mechanics and overall polish had created. Still, I’m pretty sure that you dear reader might just enjoy Dead Meets Lead more than I did. Guess you should have a look then; click here. The demo should help you decide whether this is for you or not.

Verdict: A quality indie production with some interesting touches, that has sadly been let down by its core gameplay mechanic.

Update: The game has since gone freeware: Here is the statement from their website:

We’ve had a great time with Dead Meets Lead, but since we’re shutting down operations (or rather, they’ve been down for a while now) we’d like to do one last thing for the community. Starting from today, we’re making Dead Meets Lead a freeware so that those who haven’t tried the game yet get a chance to play it too. Everyone is free to download and play the game, just use the product key below and go to the download section to get your copy. Hope you’ll have a good time with the Captain and his adventures!

17ad0e29-d567-4455-a7a3-108541e01558

Droidscape: Basilica

Droidscape: Basilica

Indie developer Kyttaro Games makes their App Store debut today with Droidscape: Basilica, a carefully crafted action-puzzle game more than a year in the making. This sprawling sci-fi puzzler features 60 challenging levels, clay-modeled characters animated with stop-motion technology, intuitive touch controls, and an optional “HeadTwister” mode that turns the gameplay hands-free.

The game can be downloaded worldwide from the App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/droidscape-basilica/id586086388?ls=1&mt=8

Droidscape Basilica

The year is 4057, and a power-hungry Ecclesiarchy has plunged humanity into a new Dark Ages. One of few remaining Chronomancers dedicated to preserving the secrets of time-travel has been taken hostage on the gargantuan Basilica space station, and if he dies, an already dark world will get a lot darker. Only a small, unarmed droid named Bishop 7 can save him—and only with your help.

 Droidscape Basilica

In each of Droidscape: Basilica’s 60 two-stage puzzle levels, players use strategy to plot Bishop 7’s course around roaming enemy droids to pick up gems, recharge at power stations, unlock doors, and reach the exit. Then, using either simple finger swipes or the revolutionary HeadTwister controls, manipulate time to carefully guide the droid through the course without crossing the enemy’s path. As you travel deeper into the massive space station, Droidscape’s electropunk sci-fi world comes to life via stop-motion animation, futuristic music and sound effects, and a vast backstory presented in interstitial scenes between levels. Droidscape Basilica

 

Still in its experimental stages, Kyttaro’s HeadTwister technology uses the front-facing camera of newer model iOS devices to replace a flick of the finger with a shake of the head. In this mode, players send Bishop 7 along the plotted course by turning their head right to step forward, or left to step back. The developers plan to refine the technology based on player feedback, with the ultimate goal of developing fully head-controlled games in the future. For those with older devices or who prefer a more tactile experience, the game is also completely touch enabled.

Droidscape: Basilica is a Universal App playable on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. It sells for USD $1.99 (or its equivalent in local currency. The game’s HeadTwister mode can be experienced on iPad 2 and up, iPhone 4S and up, or iPod touch 5.

Learn more about Droidscape: Basilica at the official website: http://droidscape.kyttarogames.com/

About Kyttaro Games

Founded in 2011, Kyttaro Games has until now been best known for its thematic, pay-what-you-want Bundle In A Box indie gaming bundles and the Indie Dev Grant designed to help indie developers create new games. Kyttaro Games approached their debut game, Droidscape: Basilica, like an interactive work of art, collaborating with sculptor/painter Hariton Bekiaris and composer Chris Christodoulou. Learn more at http://www.kyttarogames.com.

Cthulhu Saves the World

Cthulhu Saves the World
I was never particularly fond of JRPGs you know; never even cared for Link’s 16-bit adventures on the SNES. Cthulhu, on the other hand, now that is another matter entirely. The lovable Great Old One has always been among my, let’s say, top five mythical beasts, a fact that combined with an incredibly cheap price and a high-flying indie flag led to my playing of Cthulhu Saves The World. Oh, and the Breath of Death VII CRPG the developer kindly bundled with it made the choice of buying said bundle even easier. Apparently and after 15 hours of playing with the thing I can say it was a wise choice indeed.
 Cthulhu Saves the World
Cthulhu Saves The World is, happily, much more than a retro-styled, top-down RPG with turn based combat. It is a truly funny retro-styled, top-down RPG with turn based combat. It’s one of the few games and possibly the only RPG I’ve played on a PC that sports humour that is actually any good. Really. I verified this with the help of at least three (they were four) male and female test-subjects; they all laughed and thought that the heroic version of Cthulhu the game so obviously enjoys ridiculing is a great idea indeed.
Cthulhu Saves the World
What’s more the game itself is rather good too, though definitely not exactly my kind of CRPG. It’s pure hack-and-slash with minimal exploration, only slightly confusing dungeons and simplistic combat. If it weren’t for the demented plot, the brilliantly hilarious cut-scenes, the hundreds of hidden jokes, the excellent and deep combat system, and the fact that the game wisely rewards gamers with something different every hour or so, I’d have probably given up on it, and would have lost one of the most ridiculous game finales this side of Monkey Island 2.
 Cthulhu Saves the World
Oh, yes, also the chance to discover one single gold piece in well hidden chest in one of the later dungeons. How very silly eh? Almost on the same level of silliness of not sporting an in-game map…
Cthulhu Saves the World
As an added bonus the graphics are excellent in their retro, pixel-artsy way and the music will definitely evoke that 80s console music feeling; not that I particularly adore it, but, well, some do. And after you beat the game, you’ll unlock a ton of extras and new game-modes to make sure your purchase lasts you another 10 to 15 hours. Now, that definitely is what I’d call value for money.

Verdict: A hilarious, rich, incredibly cheap and actually good RPG. Get it.

Thunder Fleets

thunder fleets
Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear… Not the most encouraging way to start a review, I know, but I simply didn’t want to sound overtly optimistic really. Wouldn’t want anyone to get instantly excited about Thunder Fleets and recklessly stampede over to the game’s site now, would we? Of course not, for as you might have guessed Thunder Fleets isn’t a particularly good game and all this stampeding around might result to some sort of broken web-things.
thunder fleets
Still, the game does initially sound vaguely interesting, or at least it did before I actually loaded it. It is after all supposed to be some sort of naval warfare RTS taking place in the WWII-torn Pacific Ocean, where gamers have to wrestle the interface and act both strategically and tactically in order to either subdue the Japanese Imperial Fleet or the American one.Well, in theory at least, as I just can’t see how anyone could stick with Thunder Fleets for more than a couple of hours; the time needed to fully realize that this is as sub-par an offering as they go.
thunder fleets
Mind you, I really do hate writing nasty stuff about aspiring indie developers and the fruits of their work, and I’ve already fought and won a titanic battle against sarcasm. Frankly, that would have been cheap and uncalled for. Let’s just say that Thunder Fleets starts off with a lacking yet boring tutorial that fails on far too many grammatical levels and manages to exclude key information, goes on to provide with some incredibly dull and visually poor battles, only to end up in what can only be described as an explosion of frustration. Now, I’ll have to admit there’s a chance I didn’t give the game the attention it deserved, but two hours of wrestling with the scrolling mechanics and enduring impressively uninspired grey ship-like things firing at other grey things was too much, even though I did sense that some interesting ideas and mechanics were struggling to make themselves felt…
thunder fleets
I could go on and try to ridicule the thing, but I wont. Sadly knowing that the developers are reading this, I’ll humbly suggest a few things to vastly improve the game and give it a fighting chance in the rich world of commercial indie games, where it will apparently have to compete with such acclaimed games as AI WarVVVVVVEufloriaThe Dream Machine and Revenge of the Titans. I also promise that should Thunder Fleets get an update in the correct direction, I’ll be more than willing to re-review it.
thunder fleets
Here goes then: 1) Make sure the screen scrolls properly when the mouse hits its side; 2) add some music and proper sound effects; 3) make the thing playable in windowed mode; 4) fix all spelling and grammatical errors; 5) redo the tutorial from scratch; 6) redesign the interface and, above all, make sure the buttons that select tactics indicate whether they have been pressed or not; 7) add more tactical options and let players -at least- control the facing of their ships; 8) make sure the graphics are passable; 9) polish the thing; 10) add some historical bits of info; 11) add a simple intro and 12) drop the price, as an asking price of 11 euros for a game like this does feel rather outrageous.


Verdict: Almost passable for a freebie I’m afraid.

Paul Stephen-Davis: Retro Army

retro army

Name: Paul Stephen-Davis

Company: Retro Army Ltd

Profession: Coder/Artist/Designer/Director

Favorite Classic Game: Final Fantasy 7

Quote: “Just an unbelievably huge game, with an amazing immersive world, fleshed out with some great characters that yougenuiely care about”

Bio: Retro Army is a new developer of PC games, based in Edinburgh, Scotland. Our primary mission is to listen to and serve our customers needs. Our secondary mission is to hire young people looking for a break into the games industry, and to then train them within a fair/creative environment, to set out to do what they need to do.

metal wars

Project: Medal Wars : The First One

Quote: “I’m ultimately making this game for the players. I firmly believe that what players want is what should go in the game. They are our customers at the end of the day, and in my experience what they say 99% of the time is right. Medal Wars : The First One is what it is today, as a result of player and reviewers feedback and in all honesty. It’s a far better game for it”

Project Info:  Medal Wars : The First One is a goofball WW1 shooter currently in development for Windows PC. Taking inspiration from the old classics Medal Wars sets out to create a bonkers 2D shoot-fest with it’s unique targetting system ( You can perform headshots & footshots!), and to immerse the player in a world chock full of insane characters! Taking the role of a fresh recruit, It’s down to you and your madman partner ‘Buddy’ to save the inept Green Army from total destruction. After the invasion of Pebble Beach the Black Army seem unstoppable, with more tricks up their sleeves than Houdini, you’ll need to use your head as well as your trigger finger if you’re to become the greatest soldier ever! Made by just one guy Paul Stephen-Davis this is the result of four years of slave labour, love, and dedication! Prepare yourself for Medal Wars!

The Dream Machine

the dream machine
Plato, Jung, Freud, a young ordinary couple and some exquisite visuals are the true stars of The Dream Machine; an episodic, indie point-and-click adventure game I have already enthusiastically previewed and now finally get to properly review. Well, properly review its first two chapters to be precise, as apparently the third and far from final one is just around the corner and not quite available yet. Besides, reviewing unreleased stuff can be quite tricky. Impossible some might say.
Now, following my urge to simply instruct you dear reader/minion-thing to immediately hop over to the Dream Machine site and grab it -for it is a great game indeed- would be way easier, but something tells me this wouldn’t be much of a review then.
the dream machine

Anyway, let us now focus on the picture posted above. How could we describe it? Well, beautiful I suppose. Unique might come in handy too. And stylish. Yes, yes, deeply atmospheric also. Slightly ominous is another one. Definitely nice. Then again the word we are indeed looking for here ishandcrafted. Yes, as in properly, physically, manually crafted using traditional non-digital components. Everything you’ll see in the game -every backdrop, every character, every animation- was actually created by hand and photographed. This dear friend is 3D, but not of the 3D Studiokind:

the dream machine

Stunning visuals aside, the Dream Machine is an impressively good and rather traditional indie game of the point-and-click sort, that is less traditionally played via a browser and somehow manages to save your process in a cloud; or was that clouds? I frankly wouldn’t know. Steam also sports some sort of a cloud they tell me, but I’m pretty sure I was once taught clouds are made of steam and, well, did I mention it’s a great game? It is. And it’s got a great and appropriate soundtrack to go with it too.

The puzzles, though relatively easy, are varied, excellently integrated in the plot and -importantly- never feel out of place or immersion-breaking. In the surreal and perfectly paced story of the game, after all, oddness feels integral. Besides, and without wanting to spoil anything from the plot which slowly progress from helping a likeable young couple find its way around a new apartment to discovering some rather disturbing truths, I really wouldn’t care much for another vaguely disguised take on Tolkien and/or Stoker, let alone another half-baked adventure pathetically apeing genre classics. This actually is a truly original game that manages its characters, storytelling and twists way better than your average Hollywood movie.

Oh, and The Dream Machine is also one of those rare few game that constantly evoke the sense of wonder and excitement the games of yore used to. One simply can’t expect the wonderfully wonderful wonders awaiting around the next corner and I can’t help but feel this is what games were supposed to be all about.
Verdict: A wonderful, smart, visually stunning, polished and downright brilliant adventure game.Buy it. Now.

Roar Rampage

roar rampage

Roar Rampage

Following the excellent blogging style of both freeindiegam.es and OW Videogames I’ll simply urge you to play Roar Rampage. You’ll play as a pixel-art and very green version of Godzilla in a brilliant, physics-based, side-scrolling take on the Rampage! formula. Expect to be entertained.

The Button Affair

The Button Affair
Do you remember The Cat That Got The Milk and what it did with/to Kandinsky? Excellent! The Button Affair has absolutely nothing to do with it, apart from the fact that it’s vaguely in the same wide genre of action games, looks absolutely stunning itself and is the work of the very same, very talented developers. As a further way to differentiate itself from its predecessor it even sports a plot that goes a bit like this:
The Button Affair is the story of Enzo Gabriel. His quest. To steal the priceless Button Jewel from the infinitely wealthy business tycoon Victor Meirelles.
Yes, that definitely does sounds like something taken straight from a ’70s action movie and is perfectly complemented by the game’s beautifully stylized visuals that can’t help but remind me of the elegant aesthetics of Another World. Just have a look at this trailer and you’ll see for yourself dearest reader:

Oh, and if you simply have to know, The Button Affair is one of those fashionable runners that seem to be cropping up everywhere. Only not boring. And actually enjoyable. And very well done too. Also, innovative. Helps charity too and will happily run on both Mac and Windows PCs.

More Excellent Freeware Games

Ah, yes, freeware games. How we all love them, don’t we? Even more so when they are of the indie persuasion, brimming with quality, polish and innovation. You know, just like the following seven offerings that have been hand-picked for you quality gaming entertainment. There’s something for everyone mind; enjoy!

Warthogs

Warthogs: People that not necessarily hate but, well, dislike Harry Potter and love adventure games should probably love this little gem. It’s a short, sweet, beautifully pixelated, impressively crafted and occasionally sarcastic AGS offering. Interestingly, Warthogs is a also a very good adventure game too, and one discovered by the ever brilliant Indie Games Blog.

Reprisal

Reprisal: Only a demo one has to admit, but such a promising one (one has to also admit). Oh, and everybody will have to further admit that Reprisal is an incredibly intriguing take on Populous, which itself hasn’t been properly remade for ages. Not that I’m talking about a remake; what we have here is more of something inspired by Populous. Obviously something that let’s you raise mountains and destroy virtual lives too.

Ultima IV

Ultima IV: A gog.com freebie that will let you enjoy (relatively speaking that is) the Quest of the Avatar on modern PCs complete with a PDF assortment of manuals, maps and spellbooks. Just don’t expect to be overly thrilled. This is an archaic and badly aged roleplaying offering with an infuriating morals mechanic and a demented parser; still, it’s somehow considered a classic so there.

Forget Me Not

Forget Me Not: You could of course pay and grab this psychedelic Pac-Man-esque thing for youriDevice (should you own one), but the free PC version is just so much better. And rather unique too, as you get to blast an impressive menagerie of vaguely recognizable baddies. Excellent fun for the extended family this one! Besides, grandpa would never get to manage them touch-screen controls.

Cryptozookeeper

Cryptozookeeper: A huge, polished, well-written and lavishly illustrated piece of interactive fiction I have yet to finish. Should you enjoy its weird animals, tons of characters, lovely soundtrack, odd visuals and splatterpunk-iness, you’d be better off grabbing the boxed version available. You’d also be helping the rise of a new era of text adventures, which would be really nice.

Maldita Castilla

Maldita CastillaLocomalito, that amazing indie developer, plays with the Ghosts ‘n’ Goblinsformula. Why? For love, culture and glory of course, and in order to create a pretty brilliant action platformer with a distinct retro feel. The game is short, looks spectacular and sounds like a proper arcade machine. It’s not too hard either.

Hero's Adventure

Hero’s Adventure: Disturbing and over in 30 seconds, that’s what it is, yet I love it. It reminds me of certain teen experiences I might have had. What’s more, Hero’s Adventure is a truly smart and cynical take on top-down CRPGs. And Terry Cavanagh created it. And I love it, but I already said so, didn’t I?

Rad Raygun

Rad Raygun

Rad Raygun, the Mega Man-inspired XBox Live Indie Game, has been gaining fans since it’s recent release. The throwback game title is part of a lifelong gaming journey for programmer and Corinth, Texas resident Chris Bryant.

“I was born in 1981, so the Nintendo Entertainment System was my first console,” Bryant recalled. “But I can distinctly remember watching my older brother play Asteroids and Missile Command on the Atari 2600. To this day, just seeing the Asteroids cartridge brings back some good memories.”

While continuing to game as he grew older, Bryant notes that even as the technology advanced, his heart remained with the classics, noting Super Mario Bros., a game he states he still plays today.

“I know it’s cliche, but I still play it in absolute awe,” he said of the 1985 Nintendo classic. “How did they get it so right? The graphics, sound and play mechanics were not only groundbreaking but flawlessly executed.”

Bryant’s love for games quickly turned into a dream of designing them, a goal he states started before he was even old enough to drive.

Rad Raygun

“I spent most of my childhood trying to learn anything that could get me in the video game industry, such as programming and 3D animation,” he said. “I can remember being 13 or 14 and wanting absolutely nothing for Christmas. All I wanted was knowledge. I wanted to know how to make games. I would make little text games in QBasic. I would also download other people’s source code and dissect it, trying to figure out how it worked. In 10th grade Computer Science class, I built my first two actual games, a clone of Pong and a clone of Frogger. In fact, I got in trouble for sharing my source code for Frogger because my classmates were playing that instead of paying attention in class! But, it all worked out…the teacher said he’d let it go if I shared the source code with him as well.”

Rad Raygun

Two years ago, the idea for Rad Raygun came into Bryant’s head. He reached out to a peer with the concept.

“I still have the e-mail to Chris Hernandez, a co-worker of mine and Rad Raygun’s creative director,” Bryant said. “His reply of ‘I’m absolutely 1000 percent into it’ was huge. I knew I had an amazing talent on my team that I could rely on for not just artwork, but a creative storyline as well.”

For the first year, everything for the game was developed for the PC version, according to Bryant. The programmer recalls issues with long load times when finally tested on the XBox 360, requiring a significant amount of time re-writing the code in a way that wouldn’t interfere with the level design already completed for the indie title. With just days to go before launch, more problems with load times came to light.

Rad Raygun

“The Xbox 360 is indeed a powerhouse, but only when used correctly,” Bryant noted. “The engine had serious memory management issues that weren’t visible on the PC. I spent days tweaking and optimizing the engine in hopes of alleviating the issue. This was the ultimate low for me. My team dedicated their nights and weekends to this project for over two years and, only two days from launch, I wasn’t sure if it would ever see the light of day.”

With a looming deadline, Bryant managed to find an issue he’d overlooked numerous times.


“While examining the game’s memory usage for the 100th time, I noticed that the maps were allocating way more memory than they should,” he noted. “It turns out that there was a bug in the level editor and the maps were exported with a ton of extraneous data at the end of the files. I wrote a tool to clean up the extraneous data from the map files, reloaded the game on the 360, and all of my framerate issues were gone.”

Following Rad Raygun‘s launch, Bryant says while he now feels a little extra pressure to make his next game, he is enjoying hearing back from fans of the game.

“I’m still trying to let it all sink in,” he said. “It sounds cheesy but this is really a dream come true. It really means a lot to me when I hear that people ‘get it’ and are able to connect with the game on a nostalgic level, sit back and enjoy the ride.”

Rad Raygun is available for 80 Microsoft points at this link.

A Thousand Free Games

Okay, one thousand free games would be a tad excessive, but half a dozen ones would be more than appropriate for this most interesting of springs. Besides, I hadn’t done one of those freeware lists for quite some time now and the voices were rather angry; they also insisted on being as eclectic as possible…

 

Vidiot

Vidiot

Vidiot: Described by its creator as Halo meets Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing, this is a truly demented offering and a delightfully weird collection of mini-games. Oh, and it can easily be used do emotionally scar your kids and/or pets.

 

Poacher
Poacher

Poacher: Metroidvania done by wise game critic and accomplished adventure designer Yahtzee and done right. Also, with a healthy does of humour. Also, also, one of the very few games pitting you against rabbits. Fluffy ones too.

 

Unga needs Mumba
UNGA needs MUMBA

UNGA needs MUMBA: Hunt a mammoth! Be a successful stone age hunter! Feel like Unga! Meet Mumba! Love Nonga! Enjoy the excellent graphics and voices! Solve puzzles! Explore caves! Point! Click!

Orbiter 2010

Orbiter 2010

Orbiter 2010: Still haven’t managed to buy Mass Effect 3? Well, I wouldn’t worry. Orbiter is here and it will let you explore space in a much more realistic and cost-effective way. Should probably last longer too, as this is a proper simulation.

Masters of Constantinople

Masters of Constantinople

Masters of Constantinople: Text away in a tale of intrigue, mystery and Byzantine betrayals while the Empire crumbles and knowledge has to be preserved. It’s a very interesting choose-your-own-adventure affair with more than a few meaningful choices.

 

[vimeo width=”560″ height=”420″]http://vimeo.com/36934912[/vimeo]
Epic Sax Game

Epic Sax Game

Epic Sax Game: Because it almost sounds rude and is the most brutally hard rhythm game I’ve ever encountered. Still, persevere and you’ll be rewarded.

Egress: The Test of STS-417

Egress - The Test of STS-417
I really do love freeware (and not-so-freeware), indie, AGS-crafted adventures. I enjoy their imaginative takes on the genre, their unexpected themes, their wild puzzles, their sheer variety and their pixel art visuals that so nostalgically remind me of my gaming youth. It’s only rarely though that I’m blown-away by their (relatively, to be precise) high-res graphics and lavish animated intros, and the newly released Egress has a pretty stunning opening cinematic. It sports some lovely, hand drawn, frame-by-frame 2D animation, and though short, it’s even more impressively accompanied by a few ending sequences, to go along with the game’s multiple endings.
 Egress - The Test of STS-417
Eye candy aside, and there’s quite a bit of it as Egress is very good looking first-person adventure indeed, this short sci-fi offering is a also a good and atmospheric game. Set in the outer reaches of space, it follows you, the commander of a two man recon team attacked by a weird black blob, as you explore a mysterious planet, search for you partner (his screaming is rather annoying apparently), try to figure out what’s going on and, quite obviously, save yourself. All this with the help of a pretty standard interface and against some mostly easy but definitely enjoyable puzzles.
You can download Egress either from its very own, lovingly crafted site over at Krams Design(where you can also show your appreciation by donating and getting some excellent wallpapers as a reward) or via the AGS forums. The game is of course happily freeware.

At A Distance

at a distance
Terry Cavanagh is a brilliant game designer, an inspired artists and -from what my dark sources tell me- a very good person too. Following the release and well-deserved success of the second best platformer of all time, he has been coming up with some incredibly wild designs while, hopefully, working on a very intriguing CRPG. Anyway, following the release of American Dreamand Hero’s Adventure Terry has finally unleashed the ground-breaking At A Distance. A game that has already confused, frustrated and brilliantly entertained visitors of more than a few gaming exhibitions.
At A Distance - indie game - gameplay screenshot

At A Distance, you see, is a psychedelic two-player puzzle game that’s been designed to be played on two computers running side by side. It is a game sporting unique visuals, an amazing atmosphere, fantastic mechanics and an uncanny ability to feel like a collaborative board game that has somehow made it inside a computer. It is thus an original and very much indie offering in which the right player will be looking at something like this:

At A Distance - indie game - gameplay screenshot
whereas the left player will be admiring this:

At A Distance - indie game - gameplay screenshot

Both players will have to try things out, discuss, think, navigate, jump and come up with puzzle solving ideas all the while looking at each others screens. Intrigued? Good, you should be, for I’m not saying anything else, besides pointing out that though you could tackle the game by yourself, really reader, don’t.

Simply visit the At A Distance site and download the game for free for it has finally been publicly released.