Gamer Profile

Profile: Hollyanne Setola

Alt F4 was honored to feature Hollyanne Setola in our latest episode where we talked about her history of gaming from being introduced to gaming by her grandmother who worked at NASA, to her Counter Strike days with her teammates. We also talked about the current landscape of gaming and todays gamers and the difference between now and only a few years ago. Our discussion about bullying and internet trolls sheds some light on what many, but specifically women deal with in gaming today. [...]

Profiled: Brad Smith

Gamer Profiles heads to the great white north to talk with developer, Brad Smith on his latest project titled, Lizard. His Kickstarter brings us a cool platformer for the NES where you explore an 8-bit world while wearing a lizard for a true retro inspired adventure. Brad has been a fan of classic games all his life from Metroid 2 on the Gameboy to Prince of Persia on the PC. Brad is also a fan of video game music and began creating his own music own music for the Nintendo. [...]

Gamer Profile: Jan Kavan

CBE Software is an independent video game studio in the Czech Republic that has released a number of games including their current game, the fantastic, J.U.L.I.A: Among the Stars We had a chance to talk with Jan Kavan, one of the dynamic duo at CBE Software about his experiences growing up as a fan of video games in a gaming culture different than many may be used to. [...]

Gamer Profile: James C. Burns

I blew a lot of lunch money on that bad boy, but what really hooked me was when I got my first GAMEBOY… I loved the game for a simple reason….endless ammo!!! and endless replays..well… until he battery dies… I came out of the pin ball era where all you got for a quarter (thats about $50 in present day rates) was five metal spheres and it got really expensive really fast just learning how to play…. I could’ve bought a mustang with the cash I stuck in that tin box. With a Game boy I could play SI all night and all day…I have no memory of any traveling I did for about 18 months because my head was bent over the GB perfecting the hold and sweep tactic…whole smoking of incoming…I loved the hold and sweep technique….similar to a spray and pray in and FPS…just hold the trigger and move the canon back and forth…chicks just did not understand that their love would not have cured me. ~James C. Burns [...]

Gamer Profile: Dave Vogt

In the end, not Mega Man, not Mario, not even Castlevania could take that spot. It had to be Zelda. This was the game that changed everything for me. The feeling of awe that overwhelmed me the first time I stepped foot into Hyrule has never quite been duplicated- and the intrigue built from there. That sense of wonder and exploration have not only had a huge part in my getting into game development, but truly cemented my love of video games. [...]

Gamer Profile: Carrie Swidecki

There was something cute about those twin dragons Bub and Bob that hooked me into the game. Plus I loved the simplicity of the graphics and the background music. This was the 1st game that I became obsess with getting both a high score and trying to complete the game. I would blow bubbles against the wall in between moving up levels and killing enemies to get max points. I would restart the game if I missed any bonus food items on a level to max my score. Bubble Bobble is also the 1st game that I stayed up all night long, so I could make it to the 100th level to complete the game. It is the only game that I have fully completed on Nintendo and I was 10 years old!! I like to say it’s the game that made me a hardcore gamer!! [...]

Gamer Profile: Stephen Barton

I loved 3D Monster Maze on the Spectrum ZX, but Doom really reset the bar entirely. The soundtrack was awesome (especially given the resources available), but what really got me hooked was that it was the first game I ever played involving a network. That you could be on one computer and playing someone on an entirely different computer in a different room with just a null modem cable between the two, before we even had an internet connection – that was special. [...]

Gamer Profile: Jay Mohr

I loved Donkey Kong Jr. and spent so many rolls of quarters on it. There was also Dig Dug at my local Ihop and I wore that out too. I wasn’t particularly good at Dig Dug but I loved digging and digging and planning on how the rocks would fall and blowing dudes up with my air pump. Donkey Kong Jr. I loved because it had it all for the time. great graphics. Jumping, swinging, timing and a mission to save someone. [...]

Gamer Profile: Evan Hahn

Windforge is a steampunk building block RPG, with fully buildable airships. It’s kind of like a mix of Contra and Minecraft with flying airships. It’s a game that embraces freedom, creativity, and chaotic emergent action. There a million things to do in Windforge, even pretty outrageous things like mining whales for meat, or even turning them into airships. [...]

Profiled: Daryl Rodriguez & Jeanette Garcia

World 1-1 is the first in a documentary series on the history of video games. This chapter is about the early years including Atari and how they helped to create a new industry. It focuses on the business deals, the personalities of the pioneers, and the creations of the engineers. This documentary will be a combination of interviews, archival footage, and reflection that retells the story to a new generation that may not know the roots of their favorite hobby [...]

Gamer Profile: The Unallied

More than all other games, the original Pokemon was a game that hides its complex mechanics under a dead-simple interface. I like many Nintendo games for this reason, but I’m still impressed with how well they distilled the RPG formula into a one-on-one battle with just 4 actions for each side. The game gets much more complex simply by giving you many choices – you can customize your 6-Pokemon team, choosing them from 150 types, and choose the best 4 moves for each one. This kind of “layered complexity” is something I try to think about when designing games, and Pokemon was how I learned it. [...]

Gamer Profile: Ryan Culver

Now one of my most memorable video game experiences was playing the original NES at my friend’s house as a kid and working every night to beat Super Mario Bros. It was by far the most popular and talked about game at that time and the big challenge then was to beat that dragon. We had gotten there a couple times before but got killed, so every time you made it to the last part, you’d get nervous, like something real was actually on the line. [...]

Gamer Profile: Cambria Edwards

I didn’t have gaming consoles growing up, but my cousins did and I was over there all the time. Donkey Kong was one of the first games I ever played and I fell in love. Whenever a new console came out, of course my cousins had it and monopolized it. So I would go in the other room and play my Donkey Kong on the Nintendo. Even in the early 2000’s I would always ask to play until they finally got rid of their system. I was a bit heartbroken and it still remains one of my favorite games to this day. [...]

Gamer Profile: Ashly Burch

I really like games that are deceptively complex and that don’t hold your hand at all. One of my favorite modern games is Spelunky, as a point of reference. Harvest Moon is actually incredibly nuanced and difficult (I failed miserably the first time I played it), but — potentially unlike Spelunky — it’s an absolute joy to play no matter how well or poorly you’re doing. It does an awesome job of creating a simplistic but deep world that feels real and is filled with secrets and possibilities that aren’t apparent on the surface. Also, I think competing in festivals and courting a potential wife is empirically fun no matter who you are. [...]

Dominique Vial: Domsware

We were on our final “lycée” studies and we needed to prepare THE french exam named “baccalauréat”. It’s very important to make a big score to this exam because it’s the passcard to university and High Schools. Anyway. We spend a lot of time playing DM instead of working our final exams. Locked on my friend’s bedroom, our parents believed we were working on our studies! Ah ah ah! It was a really immersive and addictive game. And, for the story purpose, a friend of my elder brother was working on some computer science laboratory on some kind of “network”. He was helping us by providing us printed listings containing the precious answers to hard DM’s issues: these was from this mysterious “network”. Later and later I found the name of this guy on a W3C document: I then understood he was one of the first working on the internet and that was the mysterious network. He was a pioneer while we were exploring dungeons ! [...]

John Getty: Exato Game Studios

As an entrepreneur and gamer by nature, I always wanted to create video games. It started very early in middle school as I modded games like Starcraft and Command and Conquer: Red Alert, then dabbled a little in RPG Maker and flash. When I got to college, I met a good friend who shared a similar interest and with very little deliberation (we were both very excited), we started Exato Game Studios. [...]

Thais Weiller: JoyMasher

I just love beautiful well done 2D graphics and both of these games grab me at first because of that. I grew to love them, however, for very different reasons. I love the sense of solitude and utilitarianism Metroid makes the player feel. It’s like “You felt in this cliff with no platforms back to security. Deal with it”. Mario World 2: Yoshi’s Island is completely different and I love the small and simple design choices that made the game so much fun. The joyful pace, the lovely sound tracks, Yoshi’s extra jump which makes the player fell just a bit more confident and Mario’s cries (though a bit disturbing in the beginning, they end up bringing a sense of familiarity to the gameplay and also were a not too punitive punishment to the player). [...]

Will Brierly: Soda Drinker Pro

I love both of these games for different reasons. Burgertime because I love the gameplay, and it’s a game that I’ve consistently come back to since a little kid, I still can’t get very far in it but i don’t mind. I just love that game. I also love Loom for the story and the beautiful artwork. I loved how you had to use the spell book that came with it too to cast spells. A truly creative game that I’ll never forget. [...]

Standing the test of Time

For our panel the gang went over some questions featured on our Facebook page and then discussed games that stand the test of time. In other words, classic games that even over 30 years old are still fun and worth playing today. Finally, we discussed classic games that had a lasting impact on us. Games that defined the culture of the time and/or our gaming habits. [...]

Gamer Profile: John A Pompa

I love all games. Both old and new, but the classic/retro ones, are the ones that appeal to me more. I’m a collector of game systems and computers. It seems the older I get, the farther I drift back in these gaming machines. The older stuff, and this is just my own personal opinion, has a much greater re-play value. I mean Batman ArkhamCity on the Xbox 360 or PS3 is great, looks amazing and is super fun. But once it’s beaten, I will most likely never go back to it. Yars’ Revenge on the Atari 2600 is a different story with me, that game could never get old. [...]

Gamer Profile: Pamela Horton

I heard about it from my group of friends who had read articles on it back in 2009. The very first character I ever played was Janna. I was really good with her (or so I thought.) The second character I played was Teemo. It was love at first mushroom kill. He’s so cute! With Teemo I play AP hybrid, starting with boots and pots, building into a malady and a wits end. I always built Magic Resist because I was usually mid with Teemo. I was hard on banks top too. 🙂 I also play an AP support Soraka so my heals and skills do more than your typical support. It tricks the enemy team to blowin their ults and CDs thinking they are going to get a kill. Then they see their target full health and start focusing me. 😀 [...]

Gamer Profile: Jeff Lewis

It’s my favorite game because, even though the graphics are quite awful, I love tanks and the multiplayer version is soooo fun with a couple friends especially when you have these weapon pick ups you can get that are randomly spread throughout the map. I wish I could get it on xbox but I still don’t see it available yet. [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Brian Cady

Brian Cady enjoys maintaining and restoring classic pinball and arcade games as much as he enjoys playing them. He was inducted into the International Video Game Hall of Fame as part of the inaugural 2010 group, is the Vice President of the non-profit organization that produces the Northwest Pinball and Arcade Show and is the Senior Twin Galaxies Referee for pinball. Brian has worked in the IT field for over 15 years and held leadership positions at IBM, Washington Mutual and Microsoft. He also enjoys photography and writing and has had numerous articles published including several in the Pin-Game Journal. Brian lives in Bonney Lake, Washington with his wife Shirley (who has the world record on Sky-Line) and three children. [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Eric R. Cummings

It’s an NES RPG by Capcom based on events that took place in Second Century China that first puts you in the shoes of Liu Bei, Guan Yu and Zhang Fei (The same guys from the ROTK and Dynasty Warriors series by Koei) to quell the Yellow Turban Rebellion. At first it seems like a Dragon Warrior clone in which your party moves at a high speed but upon further inspection, it’s a cool history lesson wrapped in the guise of an entertaining video game. Battles are fought in two ways, turn based and strategic with weapons and magic or a quick fight option where everyone fights at a high speed until stopped or one party is wiped out. The coolest thing about the game is the ability to recruit hundreds of defeated opponents to add to your stable of generals and incorporate them into your 5 man (7 man total, 2 in reserve) battle party. [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Rudy J. Ferretti

This game was the ONLY reason I rushed home from school each day to play the NES, I was intrigued by the colors, the originality and the secrets. I loved the idea of being a Vampire Hunter locked inside a castle and no way to turn back, scoring points and learning how to defeat and master the game and the enemies and bosses. The music was so advanced for it’s time and I could remember playing it in my head and talking about it at recess at school, and the problems we had with certain enemies and bosses in the game, and although there were games similar to this game out there, NOTHING compares to the game and the series in itself, and everyone one of them were unique in their own way, I will and have always been a fan dark/evil games and movies but, this game and series is prob the biggest reason why I started playing the NES… [...]

Dylan Barker: Cadenza Interactive

Making games is hard, particularly for people who grew up immersed in gaming culture. Your first forays into development never live up to your standards, because despite having ideas about what makes a good game, experience and understanding with actually making games is critical. Our first game, Sol Survivor, ended up being a fun game, but in a way it has exposed for me just how little I knew at the time about making games. I’m encouraged, though, by hearing other creatives (in this case Ira Glass) talk about that blow to the creative ego. The only way to move past it is to never stop creating. For every hundred things you create, you’re lucky to find one that’s great. The thing that separates game design success from failure is the ability to iterate; there are no “silver bullets.” [...]

Gamer Profile: Australian Retro Gamer

I’m partial to all types of gaming genres, but beat’em ups are pretty much at the top of the pile. Double Dragon was the first beat’em up to introduce two-player co-operative play. For this reason, it was great to have a mate with you beating up some baddies with either your fists, baseball bats, knives, barrels, whips, you name it, they could pick it up and use it. Also, who else could get away in a fight wearing sunglasses. [...]

Nathan Bradford: Mr. Gravity

The controls are simple yet addicting, there is a lot to explore in such an early game including lots of secrets that I’m still discovering despite having played through the game nearly a dozen times. There is a level system which makes me want to keep playing it rather than simply just going through it. There is more than one ending. Overall I feel it’s a very well made game for its time. [...]

Andy Briggs: Pwned

This is a tough question, I could of gone with a few games that I loved growing up, Mike Tyson’s Punch Out, Mario Bros., Skate or Die and countless other ones, Tetris is just one of those games that I can jump into at any time, play a quick game and bounce right out. I feel it still holds up today with gameplay. It’s not a very complicated game and the graphics might be big blocks, but to me, that’s the appeal of the game. To this day, I still play it as often as I can, maybe once a week or more if time allows. The reason why I love this game is because it causes you to objectively think fast. It’s just one of those games that I can be so emerged into that I don’t really care what’s happening outside, it’s nice to feel lost in a game that requires critical thinking. [...]

The Interview: Jace Hall

So I thought, here I am leaving the active game development industry to attempt to make movies and television shows in traditional Hollywood, while at the same time continuing to play games and hang out with my game industry friends… I was experiencing a unique culture clash between two industries and I thought it might be interesting to capture some of the moments with a video camera. And so The Jace Hall Show was born! [...]