Jonathan Malave: Kuroato Media

Kuroato Media

Name: Jonathan Malave

Title: Founder, Game Designer & Producer

Company: Kuroato Media

Favorite Classic Game: Final Fantasy 7

Tell us why it is your favorite: It’s the only game I have ever played over and over again, and never got bored of it. I love Japanese Anime; Final Fantasy 7 always gave me the feeling like I was taking part of an anime or something. Also, who could deny how cool and bad-ass the main characters, rivals Cloud and Sephiroth were? I have yet to find another game with rival characters that could match their synergy. Overall I think it was the Characters and the Storyline that did for me. Final Fantasy 7 is one of the best games ever made! and I think Square Enix should remake it.

 

Final Fantasy VII Trailer

Final Fantasy 7 cover Playstation
Final Fantasy 7 cover Playstation

A blast from the past, arguably one of the best Final Fantasy games out there. Created by Square in 1997 this role-playing game brought new visuals and music to the series that American games had not seen before. With an engaging story and memorable characters it sold millions not only in Japan, but across the world.

It was much more than just the gameplay or the graphics even the music captivated fan leading to impressive sales of the soundtrack. From there the movie Advent Children was made and still today fans beg for a sequel. Like it or not FF7 redefined not only the Final Fantasy series but role-playing games itself.

Final Fantasy 7 Remix for 360 and PS3

Final Fantasy 7 intro
Final Fantasy 7 intro

After years of fans asking for a revamp of FF7 and the anger fans felt over getting only a small changed to the game in the PSP version Square Enix announced today the Final Fantasy 7 Remix.

Everyone remembers Cloud, Tifa, Aeris and of course Sepiroth well take a picture because it will last longer. None of these guys are going to be in the remix, in fact the remix we are talking about has nothing to do with the game and instead have to do with one of my favorite subjects, cos-playing.

So without further ado I am proud to present Obsolete Gamers first annual April Fool’s Day cos-play photo shoot staring character from the beloved FF7 RPG.

Cloud cosplay
Cloud cosplay
Vincent cosplay
Vincent cosplay
Sephiroth cosplay
Sephiroth cosplay
guy Tifa cosplay
guy Tifa cosplay

I would just like to thank all the fans of Obsolete Gamer for this chance to pull this April Fool’s prank on you. You guys rock! Thank you for the support!

Thanks to FANTAPANTS for the video!

Not So Jolly Roger

anti-drm

Piracy is once again back in the headlines, for several reasons. The latest DRM for PC games from Ubi Soft has been heavily satirised by the web cartoonists. The industry has also released figures showing losses accumulated due to game piracy. Then there was the million-dollar fine for the Australian accused of illegally uploading a Wii game.

Let’s deal with Ubi Soft’s DRM first. Producers have a right to protect their content. After all, they have invested a lot of money in getting it to market. However, as soon as that starts to make things inconvenient for a legitimate user, then the balance is wrong. While the new system does allow unlimited installs – handy for the PC fanatic who constantly upgrades their hardware – and “Cloud” save data online, the reliance on a permanent Internet connection is less welcome. You have to be online to play, and any interruption in your connection will cause the game to stop abruptly. Progress since your last save will be lost, forcing you to go back to the last checkpoint or whatever the game has. One cartoon characterised the software as being like a stalker or jealous partner, calling and harassing you, particularly if you “move on” to another game.

We can all probably tell stories of difficult to install software, or long and boring anti-piracy messages that cannot be skipped. Surely there must be some way to detect a legitimate copy and jump past those messages, and force the pirates to watch them? Codemasters’ Operation Flashpoint from a few years ago was clever enough to work out that it was an illegal copy and gave the illusion of continuing to run properly but gradually disabling features.

The sad truth is, the current generation of consumers has got used to the idea that virtually all the entertainment they want can be found for free. The one thing they haven’t grown up with is the moral judgement on whether they SHOULD get the music, TV or games they want in an illegal manner. But on the other side of the argument, software companies touting figures of a “$300 million loss” have missed the point. How many of those people illegally downloading would not have bought the game anyway? From my experience of people who pirate, the increased consumption rate that illegal activity gives them also means a shorter attention span. And while many of those who download music are also big legal consumers as well, using downloads to find potential new purchases, the higher price tag of games would seem to mitigate that effect.

The car boot sales and market stalls may be heaving with pirate games and DVDs, but the vast majority of console owners still buy their games (albeit many of them second-hand). The target of the authorities should be those dealing in thousands of illegal copies and not the individual caught with a few. In the long term, piracy hurts us as consumers more than the companies.