Gamer Profiles

Our exclusive profile feature where we reach out to celebrities, world record holders, company reps and notable gamers and asking them about their favorite classic game and you can see the results and answers here.

Gamer Profile: Jeff Lewis

It’s my favorite game because, even though the graphics are quite awful, I love tanks and the multiplayer version is soooo fun with a couple friends especially when you have these weapon pick ups you can get that are randomly spread throughout the map. I wish I could get it on xbox but I still don’t see it available yet. [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Ben Mullen

The movie itself follows the story of 6-10 of the best NES Tetris players in the world covering their training routine, love of the game, past present and future plans: I am one of those players I currently hold the lines record (well sort of, but i certainly did at the time of filming) and am in first place (amoung those who have not maxout out yet) sort of a “best of the worst of the best” haha [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Matt Miller

With seemingly endless game play and a crafty A.I., Night Stalker not only tests your skill and reflexes, it challenges your will. Squaring off against a relentless and perpetually respawning invisible robot (from the 80,000 point mark on) along with three other omnipresent threats in an enclosed battleground, one is routinely faced with split second fight versus flight decisions, which provides edge of the seat excitement. [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Brian Cady

Brian Cady enjoys maintaining and restoring classic pinball and arcade games as much as he enjoys playing them. He was inducted into the International Video Game Hall of Fame as part of the inaugural 2010 group, is the Vice President of the non-profit organization that produces the Northwest Pinball and Arcade Show and is the Senior Twin Galaxies Referee for pinball. Brian has worked in the IT field for over 15 years and held leadership positions at IBM, Washington Mutual and Microsoft. He also enjoys photography and writing and has had numerous articles published including several in the Pin-Game Journal. Brian lives in Bonney Lake, Washington with his wife Shirley (who has the world record on Sky-Line) and three children. [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Eric R. Cummings

It’s an NES RPG by Capcom based on events that took place in Second Century China that first puts you in the shoes of Liu Bei, Guan Yu and Zhang Fei (The same guys from the ROTK and Dynasty Warriors series by Koei) to quell the Yellow Turban Rebellion. At first it seems like a Dragon Warrior clone in which your party moves at a high speed but upon further inspection, it’s a cool history lesson wrapped in the guise of an entertaining video game. Battles are fought in two ways, turn based and strategic with weapons and magic or a quick fight option where everyone fights at a high speed until stopped or one party is wiped out. The coolest thing about the game is the ability to recruit hundreds of defeated opponents to add to your stable of generals and incorporate them into your 5 man (7 man total, 2 in reserve) battle party. [...]

TGI Trading Card Profiles: Rudy J. Ferretti

This game was the ONLY reason I rushed home from school each day to play the NES, I was intrigued by the colors, the originality and the secrets. I loved the idea of being a Vampire Hunter locked inside a castle and no way to turn back, scoring points and learning how to defeat and master the game and the enemies and bosses. The music was so advanced for it’s time and I could remember playing it in my head and talking about it at recess at school, and the problems we had with certain enemies and bosses in the game, and although there were games similar to this game out there, NOTHING compares to the game and the series in itself, and everyone one of them were unique in their own way, I will and have always been a fan dark/evil games and movies but, this game and series is prob the biggest reason why I started playing the NES… [...]

Dylan Barker: Cadenza Interactive

Making games is hard, particularly for people who grew up immersed in gaming culture. Your first forays into development never live up to your standards, because despite having ideas about what makes a good game, experience and understanding with actually making games is critical. Our first game, Sol Survivor, ended up being a fun game, but in a way it has exposed for me just how little I knew at the time about making games. I’m encouraged, though, by hearing other creatives (in this case Ira Glass) talk about that blow to the creative ego. The only way to move past it is to never stop creating. For every hundred things you create, you’re lucky to find one that’s great. The thing that separates game design success from failure is the ability to iterate; there are no “silver bullets.” [...]

Torben Larsen: Cope-Com

Cope-Com was founded in 1987 by Martin Pedersen and Torben Larsen with the aim of making great Amiga computer games. With the award-winning game titles Hybris and Battle Squadron they successfully proved the capabilities of the Amiga home computer. Martin Pedersen started out with a ZX81 (actually an upgraded ZX80) in 1982 and later switched over to the ZX Spectrum, which was eventually exchanged with an Amstrad. In 1985 he did the game “The Vikings” for the Amstrad. At the same time Torben Larsen was doing the graphics for the same game on the Commodore 64. This was how the two met. [...]

Gamer Profile: Australian Retro Gamer

I’m partial to all types of gaming genres, but beat’em ups are pretty much at the top of the pile. Double Dragon was the first beat’em up to introduce two-player co-operative play. For this reason, it was great to have a mate with you beating up some baddies with either your fists, baseball bats, knives, barrels, whips, you name it, they could pick it up and use it. Also, who else could get away in a fight wearing sunglasses. [...]

Nathan Bradford: Mr. Gravity

The controls are simple yet addicting, there is a lot to explore in such an early game including lots of secrets that I’m still discovering despite having played through the game nearly a dozen times. There is a level system which makes me want to keep playing it rather than simply just going through it. There is more than one ending. Overall I feel it’s a very well made game for its time. [...]

Andy Briggs: Pwned

This is a tough question, I could of gone with a few games that I loved growing up, Mike Tyson’s Punch Out, Mario Bros., Skate or Die and countless other ones, Tetris is just one of those games that I can jump into at any time, play a quick game and bounce right out. I feel it still holds up today with gameplay. It’s not a very complicated game and the graphics might be big blocks, but to me, that’s the appeal of the game. To this day, I still play it as often as I can, maybe once a week or more if time allows. The reason why I love this game is because it causes you to objectively think fast. It’s just one of those games that I can be so emerged into that I don’t really care what’s happening outside, it’s nice to feel lost in a game that requires critical thinking. [...]

David Kudrev: Retrospekt

Not only the colourful graphics and amazing soundtrack presents itself as one of a kind in a jRPG, but also the storyline, and longevity of 3 days’ worth of gameplay nonstop. I should add, that the game has a multiplayer system that no other game has ever had (at least to my recollection), where it starts off as a single player game, but when meeting other main characters on your journey, your mates can then join up via Multitap and play as them with you as well. [...]

Greg Zesinger: DoughMain

I could have gone a few different directions here – Madden 93, Super Tecmo Bowl, Castelvania, Secret of Monkey Island, or Ultima, but went with Quest For The Rings which predated them all and helped spark my interest in games. The Odyssey2 was our first home video game system..before we even started regularly using the term “video games”. In our house, they were “TV games”. As a 7 year old, I would spend quite a bit of time and effort writing up and drawing “concept images” of games I’d like to see on my beloved Odyssey. Quest For The Rings was a gamechanger – one of the first games I can remember that included multiple levels with different environments tied together by a tangible boardgame-like experience that admittedly we didn’t use as often as just jumping into the game. [...]

Yuri Moskva: Frogwares

Being a huge fan of karate-ninja stuff I was completely mesmerized when I first played this game. I was always concerned that this game is much more advanced in terms of gameplay and possibilities than any other SNES game. And all the possibilities, weapons, skills and the atmosphere… Sorry, I have to go find my old SNES console. [...]

John Master Lee: Raptr

“It’s a rare turned-based strategy game that only came out in Japan. It was published by Atlus and Namco in 1988 on the Famicon. It was the first time I was completely absorbed into the gameplay in a way that went being just a fan. It got me thinking about game design, I learned Japanese (because I couldn’t read the text otherwise!), and I never went back to board games since. It was the first time that I realized how deep and complex a game can be back on the NES.” [...]

Derek James: Polyclef Software

I’ll actually pick two. For classic arcade action, my favorite was probably Gyruss. Why? Because I thought tube shooters were cool…it was like Galaga, but in a circle! And I also really thought the electronica-style Bach music was cool. For the PC, the games I remember the most fondly were the Zork and Enchanter trilogies from Infocom. Text-based adventure and puzzle-solving games are obsolete now, but I really thought the blend of storytelling, puzzle-solving, and interactivity was very immersive and compelling. Myst was a great continuation of this style of game in graphical form, but I still have a soft spot in my heart for Infocom’s games. [...]

Robert Allen Peeler: Square Enix

While not my first RPG, or my first FINAL FANTASY, FINAL FANTASY VI was just a great game overall that hit all the points that make playing the classics often superior to games today. The large well-developed cast, the amazing soundtrack, and the maxed potential of the SNES on this title are just a few things that helped it stand out above the rest. My favorite moment was just after the world changed and Celes spent her time recuperating on the lonely island with Cid. The game forcing me to relax after this cataclysmic event, when all I thirsted for was the next great battle, really matured my perspective on storytelling through video games. [...]

Kyle Kulyk: Itzy Interactive

I just found out recently that this was Will Wright’s first game. I loved this game as a kid. It was one of the first games I played where your play area wasn’t confined to the immediate screen, and things happened off screen! Wait too long and fortifications were being built that would hamper your efforts. In the middle of a mission – too bad! Your carrier is under attack. It seems like nothing now, but at the time this was pretty revolutionary to me. [...]

Spectra: Frag Dolls

I was really really good at it. It was my very first video game addiction. I played it so much that when I closed my eyes at night I would see little pills falling. No other video games at the time appealed to me like this one did. It was the only game I was interested in playing. I played it over and over. I love Dr. Mario. [...]

Seppo Santapukki: Prank Ltd

The second Mega Man was my first encounter to the series, igniting a love that still keeps growing after 20 years – thanks to Mega Man IX and X. It taught me patience, dexterity, and above all: trying even harder upon failure. Additionally, one can only respect the fact that the music is still in a league of its own. [...]