David Kudrev: Retrospekt

Not only the colourful graphics and amazing soundtrack presents itself as one of a kind in a jRPG, but also the storyline, and longevity of 3 days’ worth of gameplay nonstop. I should add, that the game has a multiplayer system that no other game has ever had (at least to my recollection), where it starts off as a single player game, but when meeting other main characters on your journey, your mates can then join up via Multitap and play as them with you as well.

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Greg Zesinger: DoughMain

I could have gone a few different directions here – Madden 93, Super Tecmo Bowl, Castelvania, Secret of Monkey Island, or Ultima, but went with Quest For The Rings which predated them all and helped spark my interest in games. The Odyssey2 was our first home video game system..before we even started regularly using the term “video games”. In our house, they were “TV games”. As a 7 year old, I would spend quite a bit of time and effort writing up and drawing “concept images” of games I’d like to see on my beloved Odyssey. Quest For The Rings was a gamechanger – one of the first games I can remember that included multiple levels with different environments tied together by a tangible boardgame-like experience that admittedly we didn’t use as often as just jumping into the game.

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Yuri Moskva: Frogwares

Being a huge fan of karate-ninja stuff I was completely mesmerized when I first played this game. I was always concerned that this game is much more advanced in terms of gameplay and possibilities than any other SNES game. And all the possibilities, weapons, skills and the atmosphere… Sorry, I have to go find my old SNES console.

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John Master Lee: Raptr

“It’s a rare turned-based strategy game that only came out in Japan. It was published by Atlus and Namco in 1988 on the Famicon. It was the first time I was completely absorbed into the gameplay in a way that went being just a fan. It got me thinking about game design, I learned Japanese (because I couldn’t read the text otherwise!), and I never went back to board games since. It was the first time that I realized how deep and complex a game can be back on the NES.”

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Derek James: Polyclef Software

I’ll actually pick two. For classic arcade action, my favorite was probably Gyruss. Why? Because I thought tube shooters were cool…it was like Galaga, but in a circle! And I also really thought the electronica-style Bach music was cool. For the PC, the games I remember the most fondly were the Zork and Enchanter trilogies from Infocom. Text-based adventure and puzzle-solving games are obsolete now, but I really thought the blend of storytelling, puzzle-solving, and interactivity was very immersive and compelling. Myst was a great continuation of this style of game in graphical form, but I still have a soft spot in my heart for Infocom’s games.

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Robert Allen Peeler: Square Enix

While not my first RPG, or my first FINAL FANTASY, FINAL FANTASY VI was just a great game overall that hit all the points that make playing the classics often superior to games today. The large well-developed cast, the amazing soundtrack, and the maxed potential of the SNES on this title are just a few things that helped it stand out above the rest. My favorite moment was just after the world changed and Celes spent her time recuperating on the lonely island with Cid. The game forcing me to relax after this cataclysmic event, when all I thirsted for was the next great battle, really matured my perspective on storytelling through video games.

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Kyle Kulyk: Itzy Interactive

I just found out recently that this was Will Wright’s first game. I loved this game as a kid. It was one of the first games I played where your play area wasn’t confined to the immediate screen, and things happened off screen! Wait too long and fortifications were being built that would hamper your efforts. In the middle of a mission – too bad! Your carrier is under attack. It seems like nothing now, but at the time this was pretty revolutionary to me.

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Aileen Bautista: Dinoroar Interactive

I played this game religiously when I was a kid on my PC. I loved the mystical feel of the game and any opportunity to upgrade my weapons was a given. I also enjoyed all the secret rooms and codes you had to break, and every time I played that game I remember finding something new which amused me even more.

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Seppo Santapukki: Prank Ltd

The second Mega Man was my first encounter to the series, igniting a love that still keeps growing after 20 years – thanks to Mega Man IX and X. It taught me patience, dexterity, and above all: trying even harder upon failure. Additionally, one can only respect the fact that the music is still in a league of its own.

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