Company Representatives

Representatives of gaming companies, publishes, developers, indie, hardware and software. All encompassing for the world of video games.

Shaun Norton: Sandbox Strategies

This game blew my mind the first time I played it, which was via a demo disc in a gaming magazine. It was unlike anything I had played before, a remarkably polished game with an intricate story and incredibly satisfying controls and gameplay. I was hooked the second I popped the disc in, and it was one of the first games where I not only became engrossed in the story and the struggles of the amazing characters and cast, but that I also took hours and hours to replay. [...]

Nikolaus Gebhardt: Ambiera

Back then, Wolfenstein was one of the first games with ‘real’ 3D graphics, although today this is only considered 2D. I was amazed by that technology, and played though the game countless of nights. When I finished it, I started creating levels and modifications for it, which maybe lead me to working in the game industry. [...]

Lee Amarakoon: UTV True Games

It’s the game that got me into playing strategy games. With only 1 ship, you transported tanks and other units to the different bases scattered around the level in order to take over sections of the map. The ship had limited fuel, so expanding was very important since you could also refuel at the captured points. The ship could transform into a robot so you could attack the ground also. [...]

Curt Hartung: CCP

I spent over a year plumbing this game right after its release, on my apple //c, from start to finish, with no internet or cheat guides or outside help. The minimalist graphics and rich sandbox-like content allowed me to become a part of the story in a way that no other game ever has. [...]

Robby Zinchak: Archive Games

There’s something about that game that after you play it, you never forget it. I think it may have had the best story in all of games – witty, touching, and fantastical all at the same time. But it also had amazing graphics… some of those scenes are still spectacular even by today’s standards. Everything about it just came together beautifully to make an experience more detailed, more immersive, than anything I played before or since. [...]

Jonathan Collins: MiniMonos

The best burger joint in town had three arcade units when I was a kid: Frogger, Space Invaders, and Donkey Kong (showing my age here). Frogger was seriously addictive, despite (or perhaps because of) it’s simplicity. The music is enough to drive you mad, but hearing it brings back memories of great times hanging out with friends. [...]

Páll Ívarsson: CCP

The main problem was that I didn’t speak a word in English (being from Iceland) except a few words here and there and my mom claimed I wouldn’t understand it. But I ignored her warnings, and I’m glad I did. Empowered by an English to Icelandic dictionary I spent hours in front of the screen, trying to make any sense of the game. [...]

Melissa Burns: The Museum of Mobility History

Pitfall Harry entertained me for a week straight in the early 80’s while I was stuck at home trying to deal with the Chicken Pox. Even at a very young age I loved the thrill of completing a task under a tight deadline, and collecting all those treasures while timing the hazards just perfectly was the ultimate in entertainment. It kept me hooked well after I recovered from the pox. [...]

Ted Brockwood: Kalypso Media USA

Yar’s Revenge was fun because it had a very simple gameplay mechanic, and basically one enemy, but it just kept getting relentlessly harder the more you played, until it was so fast, it was almost impossible to play. That, and I had one of the highest scores in the U.S. for a short time according to the official Atari 2600 magazine. [...]

Josh Austin: D3Publisher of America

Metroid for the NES was the first gaming experience I had that affected me. At the time, all the games were colorful with bright music and lots of character. Metroid was a faceless hero isolated in a sci-fi alien world, to me there was nothing ever like this and it completely consumed me. I had to get that character through the world to complete her goal, it was a quest, and one that I couldn’t stop until I found every secret path and upgrade. [...]

Tyler Chester: Appular

I’ve always been into simulation games for a while now and it keeps me pretty busy. The Sims 1 for PS2 was really the first game that started my gaming habits. I had an original PS2, the “fatty” of them all. I think I actually got it right on release, not sure. I’m sure you can consider The Sims as a classic, right? At times it can be frustrating, and I still remember you didn’t have the ability to create multiple floors which was a draw back. Now today, The Sims series is huge like really huge. You can build like four floors today, that’s just completly insane. With all the add-ons today their is no limits with The Sims. That’s why I keep coming back to it now and then. I’ve had my fair share of house building with The Sims 3, so many tools, so little time! [...]

Jóhann Haukur Gunnarsson: CCP

For me this is the golden turn based strategy game. I still play it, even though I have finished this game so often I’ve long lost count of it. The suspense when you wait for your turn as the AI opponent stalks around is immense. The research effort, the amount of content, the strategy behind where you place your bases and what countries you strife to defend give this game a lot of depth. Replayability is an often coveted word, but few gameshave as long lasting value as that game did, and still does. And ahh, I also fondly remember the various ways I could cheat in the game by editing its save-files. [...]

Mungo Amyatt-Leir: Flight 1

I quickly become hooked, walking 4 miles each way to school so that I could spend my bus (and lunch) money on this beast. My nightmares were punctuated by the appearance of that tiny saucer and hundreds of vector-rendered tiny rocks, perfectly rotating as they hurtled across the screen with only the limited hyperspace jump acting as my saviour. [...]

Michael Mota: DreamCatcher Games

“This is the game that got me hooked in the NHL franchise. It was fast paced, exciting, and I had a blast creating my own custom team. My favorite part of this game (and every NHL game after) was the hitting/body checking. When you lay down a good solid body check, you’d hear an awesome “UGH”, followed by cheers or boos from the crowd. I’ll be honest, I still have this game at home on my shelf.” [...]

Jeroen Talman: Games Factory Online

As a little kid I never owned a NES, but we had a Sega Master System II instead. This console had the game Alexx Kid in Miracle World build in. I spent so many hours playing this game as a 6-year old boy that the nostalgic feelings I have with the game overrule other games like Sonic. The use of vehicles and mini-games such as rock-paper-scissors were impressive, just like the shop system. Alexx Kid, where are you nowadays… We miss you dearly! [...]

Alasdair Evans: Laughing Jackal

It was the first game that really made me feel something emotionally and was just so well constructed that I still go back and play it today. It also has a maturity and an eeriness that few games of the time did – especially on the SNES. There have been many imitators, including Shadow Complex, the ‘Metroidvania’ games, and the Metroid series’ own new entries in the time since, but for me Super Metroid is the ultimate single player experience and an absolute gem [...]

Frank Campbell: First Planet Company

I played Jetpac on my very first PC, the ZX Spectrum. Suddenly I wasn’t restricted by how long my pocket money would last in an arcade. I could assemble rockets and fight off aliens as much as I liked from the comfort of my own bedroom. The rubber keys, cassette loading and quaint 16k system requirements were all part of the charm, and every release from Ultimate Play The Game couldn’t come fast enough. [...]

Jay Boor: Konami

Herzog-Zwei is one of my all-time favorite titles for a number of reasons. It was the first-true real-time strategy game, and it debuted on the SEGA Genesis – it wasn’t even a PC title! At the time, Technosoft probably thought they had just developed a really fun two-player war-action game. Little did they know that they were the first to lay the foundation for all future RTS games to come. [...]

David Knippenberg: WarFactory

Up to that point, I’d never played a game where the atmosphere was so tense. It seemed like every choice you made carried great weight, especially once the turn-based squad combat started. Make a wrong move or don’t equip your team correctly, and you’ll lose your team to the depths. Very few games I’ve played since then have been able to replicate that sense of foreboding for me. [...]

Ned Coker: CCP

So many memories I’m not sure where to start, but there was just enough “Question mark” luck, strategy, diversity, taunting and “kingmaker” gameplay in it in battle mode to keep every match fresh even for the limited map selection. Nothing like taking out all three balloons and the bomb with one Star use. Simplicity at its finest. And finally, I reserve Princess Peach as my character if you wish to challenge me. [...]

Gabe Gonzales: MoneyPlum Media

It’s such a beautifully built game that I want to see its environments everywhere, so I created Shadow Moses Island for L4D and L4D2. Surprisingly the map made it into the pages of PGGamer’s top 10 L4d Mods. I have to finish them, but I seem to have builder’s block. I can assure you the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th maps are progressively (to-the-tenth-power) better than the 1st map…now if I can only focus on finishing them, it will be epic. [...]

Richard M. Holmes: Club V3

Simply a great game where you can slip into a different era and life from the comfort of your chair without unnecessary features. With each new version it gets better, whilst not destroying the simplicity addictiveness of the core game. The addition of the dancing in the latest version is superb and is a wonderful counterbalance to the hack and thrust of the remainder of the game. First played it on the C64 for months, then again on Amiga and three times on PC. For years… [...]

Brian Wyser: X-Ray Kid Studios

DD was my first experience with fighting co-op… um… for everyone back then I guess as it opened up a new genre of gameplay. My friends and I were hooked from the first day we wasted at the local sandwich shop. We probably paid for the machine 5 times over with all the quarters pumped into it. Best move was the grapple/knee to the head then toss, but watch out because you could punch your buddy too. [...]

Nery Hernandez: MonkeyPlum Media

Tie Fighter stands out for me as one of those games that has that rare quality of being an experience. From the story, the initiation into the Emperor’s Inner Circle (Secret forearm tattoo and all), the ship models, it was a game that you could tell was made with L.O.V.E. for the source material, while still maintaining an originality of its own. [...]

Steven Peeler: Soldak Entertainment

I think this was the first rpg that I played on a computer and I sure do have fond memories. Even with minimal graphics, which were actually pretty good at the time, it was still frightening and great fun exploring and killing all of the monsters. All to save some king or something. 🙂 It had multiple character types, a party, turn based combat, random encounters, layout, and items, and an auto-map. Some of this is common now, but this is from a game made almost 30 years ago. [...]

Michal Gledala: Global Fun

Some people think it is crazy to just look at the stats, clicking on numbers and watching 22 small round dots flying around the screen, but for me it is pure fun. It is a great feeling to start a career as a manager of your favorite club, and build your squad the way you want. I can spend hours on looking for players and staff that can help my team to win the league and go far in the European competition. [...]