John Getty: Exato Game Studios

As an entrepreneur and gamer by nature, I always wanted to create video games. It started very early in middle school as I modded games like Starcraft and Command and Conquer: Red Alert, then dabbled a little in RPG Maker and flash. When I got to college, I met a good friend who shared a similar interest and with very little deliberation (we were both very excited), we started Exato Game Studios.

Read more

Thais Weiller: JoyMasher

I just love beautiful well done 2D graphics and both of these games grab me at first because of that. I grew to love them, however, for very different reasons. I love the sense of solitude and utilitarianism Metroid makes the player feel. It’s like “You felt in this cliff with no platforms back to security. Deal with it”. Mario World 2: Yoshi’s Island is completely different and I love the small and simple design choices that made the game so much fun. The joyful pace, the lovely sound tracks, Yoshi’s extra jump which makes the player fell just a bit more confident and Mario’s cries (though a bit disturbing in the beginning, they end up bringing a sense of familiarity to the gameplay and also were a not too punitive punishment to the player).

Read more

Will Brierly: Soda Drinker Pro

I love both of these games for different reasons. Burgertime because I love the gameplay, and it’s a game that I’ve consistently come back to since a little kid, I still can’t get very far in it but i don’t mind. I just love that game. I also love Loom for the story and the beautiful artwork. I loved how you had to use the spell book that came with it too to cast spells. A truly creative game that I’ll never forget.

Read more

Jonathan Malave: Kuroato Media

It’s the only game I have ever played over and over again, and never got bored of it. I love Japanese Anime; Final Fantasy 7 always gave me the feeling like I was taking part of an anime or something. Also, who could deny how cool and bad-ass the main characters, rivals Cloud and Sephiroth were? I have yet to find another game with rival characters that could match their synergy. Overall I think it was the Characters and the Storyline that did for me. Final Fantasy 7 is one of the best games ever made! and I think SquareEnix should remake it.

Read more

Dylan Barker: Cadenza Interactive

Making games is hard, particularly for people who grew up immersed in gaming culture. Your first forays into development never live up to your standards, because despite having ideas about what makes a good game, experience and understanding with actually making games is critical. Our first game, Sol Survivor, ended up being a fun game, but in a way it has exposed for me just how little I knew at the time about making games. I’m encouraged, though, by hearing other creatives (in this case Ira Glass) talk about that blow to the creative ego. The only way to move past it is to never stop creating. For every hundred things you create, you’re lucky to find one that’s great. The thing that separates game design success from failure is the ability to iterate; there are no “silver bullets.”

Read more

Torben Larsen: Cope-Com

Cope-Com was founded in 1987 by Martin Pedersen and Torben Larsen with the aim of making great Amiga computer games. With the award-winning game titles Hybris and Battle Squadron they successfully proved the capabilities of the Amiga home computer. Martin Pedersen started out with a ZX81 (actually an upgraded ZX80) in 1982 and later switched over to the ZX Spectrum, which was eventually exchanged with an Amstrad. In 1985 he did the game “The Vikings” for the Amstrad. At the same time Torben Larsen was doing the graphics for the same game on the Commodore 64. This was how the two met.

Read more

Gamer Profile: Australian Retro Gamer

I’m partial to all types of gaming genres, but beat’em ups are pretty much at the top of the pile. Double Dragon was the first beat’em up to introduce two-player co-operative play. For this reason, it was great to have a mate with you beating up some baddies with either your fists, baseball bats, knives, barrels, whips, you name it, they could pick it up and use it. Also, who else could get away in a fight wearing sunglasses.

Read more

Nathan Bradford: Mr. Gravity

The controls are simple yet addicting, there is a lot to explore in such an early game including lots of secrets that I’m still discovering despite having played through the game nearly a dozen times. There is a level system which makes me want to keep playing it rather than simply just going through it. There is more than one ending. Overall I feel it’s a very well made game for its time.

Read more

Andy Briggs: Pwned

This is a tough question, I could of gone with a few games that I loved growing up, Mike Tyson’s Punch Out, Mario Bros., Skate or Die and countless other ones, Tetris is just one of those games that I can jump into at any time, play a quick game and bounce right out. I feel it still holds up today with gameplay. It’s not a very complicated game and the graphics might be big blocks, but to me, that’s the appeal of the game. To this day, I still play it as often as I can, maybe once a week or more if time allows. The reason why I love this game is because it causes you to objectively think fast. It’s just one of those games that I can be so emerged into that I don’t really care what’s happening outside, it’s nice to feel lost in a game that requires critical thinking.

Read more