Shadow of the Beast

Shadow_of_the_Beast_turbo-grafx-16

Developed by Psygnosis and published by Electronic Arts, Shadow of the Beast tells the story of a child kidnapped by mages. This child was transformed into a powerful creature to be used at their will. Years later you learn the truth of your past and set out to kill everyone involved and ultimately your master.

Wiz ‘n’ Liz

Wiz 'n' Liz - Master System - Gameplay Screenshot

Wiz ‘n’ Liz (1993)
By: Raising Hell Software / Psygnosis  Genre: Platform  Players: 1-2  Difficulty: Medium
Featured Version: Sega MegaDrive / Genesis  First Day Score: 922,300
Also Available For: Amiga

Released mid-way through the MegaDrive’s life, this quirky platformer for some reason seemed to slip under the radar for most gamers at the time. Is that because it sucks? Actually, no, and it was released on the most popular console and computer of the time, and came during a period when the genre was at its peak too, so it’s a mystery to me why more people haven’t played it! I actually first encountered it in a very favourable review in an Amiga magazine but it was the MegaDrive version I would ultimately purchase, purely because the MD is better than the Amiga as everyone knows (hee hee!), but the MD is also far better catered for as far as this kind of game is concerned too. So how did Wiz ‘n’ Liz fare against the likes of Sonic? Not too well, one might think, but could Psygnosis have a surprise in store?

Wiz 'n' Liz - Master System - Gameplay Screenshot

One of the first things you might notice when playing this game is that it’s nearly as fast as Sonic! It’s set on the amusingly-named planet of ‘Pum’ where Wiz the wizard and Liz the witch reside. Their pastime of creating new magic spells is second only to taking care of their many beloved pet rabbits. Unfortunately, however, their latest spell has gone wrong and whisked all their rabbits off to who knows where! Under your (and a friend’s) control, Wiz ‘n’ Liz immediately set out to rescue them all and restore Pum to its former glory. Finding all of their rabbits isn’t particularly hard as they’ve been liberally sprinkled across the many charming and not so charming lands that comprise Pum. They’re not just normal rabbits though, but magic rabbits, and every last one of them must be rescued.

Wiz 'n' Liz - Master System - Gameplay Screenshot
The game begins in Home Land where Wiz ‘n’ Liz’s house and magic cauldron are located. There are also some trees here in which magic fruit grow. Mixing any two of these fruits in the cauldron creates a spell whose effect depends on which combination of fruits are mixed, but the first spell creates a door which provides access to the level select area. From here you can enter the various levels (or ‘lands’) and you can tackle them in any order you want. Each land is made up of two or three rounds, and on each of these there is a set quota of rabbits to rescue. This is done by touching them and to start with they will each release letters which slowly float up the screen. Collecting these letters spells out the magic word at the top of the screen. Once it’s complete, rescued rabbits will instead release magic fruits, stars, and clocks.

Wiz 'n' Liz - Master System - Gameplay Screenshot


Collecting these items isn’t mandatory but it can be very useful. Gathering magic fruits will fill the magic-meter which, when full, makes that fruit available to mix magic spells with in Home Land. Each clock collected will add five seconds to you timer for the next stage / land, and stars can be spent on fruits, more clocks, and even extra lives in the shop, but only once you’ve worked out the magic spell to summon it! There are eight standard lands to play through (as well as one secret final land which you must earn the right to play) and they are all multi-tiered and based on some pretty standard themes such as Grass Land, Snow Land, Desert Land, Dead Land, etc. Each is also looped and the stages contained therein are timed, with the amount of time you start with being determined by which of the three skill settings you choose before play.

Wiz 'n' Liz - Master System - Gameplay Screenshot
One of the most notable things about Wiz ‘n’ Liz is that it’s nearly bereft of enemies, with only a few bosses making up their ranks. As well as the skill settings, there are also three ‘levels’ to choose between – Apprentice, Wizard, or Sorcerer – and each time you finish one of them you’ll face a boss, such as a giant malevolent tree or sunflower, before progressing to the next level. The boss you face will be determined not only by the level but also the skill setting, so there’s a good few of them, and that’s one of my favourite things about this game – the range of difficulty settings mean it’s possible to just mess around having fun and trying out new magic spells, or to really test yourself and try to finish the game properly too! There is also a superbly frantic two-player mode in with the players race each other to see who can collect their rabbit-quota first.

Wiz 'n' Liz - Master System - Gameplay Screenshot
Despite taking this long to explain, Wiz ‘n’ Liz really is a fairly simple, albeit slightly strange game! Aesthetically, things are certainly superb. The opening title sequence features some lovely wibbly reflective water effects, for example, and the in-game graphics are nicely detailed, superbly animated, amusing, and full of character. The audio on offer here is of a similarly high standard. The sound effects are superb and there are lots of tunes, including one for each land. They are still among the best I’ve heard on the MegaDrive and must surely rank highly on the list of the composer, the great Matt Furniss’ achievements, perfectly suiting the fast, frantic, arcade-style gameplay. In fact, on a good few occasions I’ve decided to play this game just to give my ears a treat before zooming through the delightful lands, getting caught up in the addictive rabbit-rescuing antics once again!

Wiz 'n' Liz - Master System - Gameplay Screenshot

That’s the best thing about Wiz ‘n’ Liz – you can play it for five minutes, you can play if for two hours, it’s great fun either way. The magic spell tomfoolery complicates the otherwise simple gameplay a little but, whilst good fun, most of the fruit combinations produce little of substance, instead mostly comprising amusing mini-games, bonus time/points, or changing some minor aspect of the game (rabbit colour, for example). That’s one of the things that most puzzles me about this game – being a platform game, it’s not completely original, but it has so many unique features and charming touches, even if many of them are superficial – it’s still a fantastic game, so its lack of success is bewildering. Not only that but it was released at a time when 2D platform games were king and originality was scarce which only confuses matters further. It’s hard to believe that it’s only the second game from the developer that would go on to become the revered Bizarre Creations (responsible for Project Gotham Racing and Geometry Wars amongst others). Wiz ‘n’ Liz is a game I would urge any platform fan to try. Besides, how could you not like a game featuring rotating fruits with faces?

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=px-WdFMeYy8[/youtube]

RKS Score: 9/10

Beastie Feastie aka Super Glob

Super Glob - Beastie Fetie - Gameplay Screenshot 1

Super Glob a.k.a. The Glob, a.k.a. Beastie Feastie (1983)
By: Epos Corporation Genre: Platform Players: 1 Difficulty: Medium-Hard
Featured Version: Arcade First Day Score: 23,350
Also Available For: Nothing

Who remembers the Psygnosis classic, Globdule, on the Amiga? It was a cavern-based collect ’em up which saw you controlling a floppy purple blob who could stick to almost anything! I’m a big fan of that game, and when I saw the abbreviated filename of this game I thought someone had finally made a sequel! Alas, it proved not to be the case, for, whilst also a platform game, this one is a little know oddity from the early 80’s. Despite what the title screen says, Super Glob is a one player game (the two-player mode just sees the players take turns). It’s your job to guide a blue blob called Toby around the single-screen stages to collect food, which includes standard game food such as strawberries, grapes, and even hunks of meat! The food has of course been sprinkled liberally all around the platforms on each screen. As you might expect, being a ‘glob’, Toby lacks the limbs to use ladders, so he can’t reach other platforms that way. He instead has to rely on the handily-located elevators which he can summon to his current platform by pressing one of the buttons nearby.

Super Glob - Beastie Fetie - Gameplay Screenshot 2

Also populating these platforms in ever increasing numbers are various enemies which take the form of animals. The first stage is populated by crocodiles but other stages are home to such seemingly benevolent creatures as rabbits, frogs, monkeys, and pigs! Of course, contact from any of these results in the instant loss of a life, although more can be gained by achieving set scores. These guardians of the food can be defeated in two ways. Firstly, if he times it right, Toby can crush them with the elevators by moving up or down into them. It’s also worth mentioning that he can actually crush himself with the elevators too, by summoning one and standing underneath it as it desends! The other way, which is probably more reliable, is to take advantage of Toby’s gelatinous nature by jumping up and sticking to the ceiling! Hold the jump button down to stay stuck, then release it to land on top of your adversary. If either of these manoeuvres are not timed right, however, it almost certainly results in contact with the creatures and subsequent death! Neither is a long-term solution either – the enemies quickly respawn close to where they originally apeared so it’s sometimes easier to just avoid them.

Super Glob - Beastie Fetie - Gameplay Screenshot 3

Before the accidental discovery mentioned earlier, I had never heard of this game. I have no idea how it was received or how popular it was, but I’m guessing it passed a lot of people by, and that’s a shame. It’s not spectacular or remarkable in any way, and I’m sure that was the case when it was first released as much as it is today, but it’s an enjoyable little game and it must’ve been pretty original back then. There is apparently 24 stages to play through here and that should prove a challenge for most gamers, but even if you can’t get very far, you’ll keep trying. It’s a very addictive game and, despite being pooly animated, Toby is quite an endearing little chap. The graphics and sound are pretty basic, with no in-game music at all, but there a lot worse games to spend ten minutes than trying out this one.

RKS Score: 6/10

Hardcore

Hardcore start menu
Hardcore start menu

Hardcore, unreleased Genesis/Mega Drive Game by Digital Illusions

Hardcore was an unreleased Sega Genesis/Mega Drive game created by Digital Illusions in 1994-1995. The rights of the game ended up being owned by Psygnosis, which Sony owns, and they had by that time killed all development and releases for the Sega Genesis/Mega Drive.

The game reminds me of the Turrican games and Abuse.

Check out a video of what the game would have been like below:

Thanks to Tobias Sixx Bergeld for the heads-up on this video.

Interview – CoLD SToRAGE (Tim Wright)

CoLD SToRAGE (Tim Wright)
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We recently interviewed one of our favorite musicians CoLD SToRAGE (Tim Wright). The following is the interviewRead More

The music of CoLD SToRAGE aka Tim Wright

CoLD SToRAGE aka Tim Wright
CoLD SToRAGE aka Tim Wright

http://www.coldstorage.org.uk/

Tim Wright aka CoLD SToRAGE has been a significant musical influence in the gaming world. Now… enjoy much of his music for free! Check out this link. He is mainly known for his work on the soundtrack of many of the Wipeout racing games that are classic racing games on Playstation. His intense music works well with these fast racing games.