World 1-1 Review

World 1-1 Review

World 1-1 is an amazing video game history documentary movie created by the team made up of Jeanette Garcia and Daryl Rodriguez, two awesome, young but thorough movie makers from Miami. Although World 1-1 automatically might make you think of the world start screen from Super Mario Bros., the film is actually about what I call the rise and fall of the original Atari (I would have probably called the film The Rise and Fall of Atari). The film covers the birth of video games from their origins in scientific labs, onto games being played on what at the time were time-shared supercomputers, to the creation of arcade video game machines, and onto the rise and fall of early video game consoles (video gaming at home).

world 1-1 movie poster

To say the film is thorough would be an understatement although the movie mainly focuses on arcade and console game development. Although I love this film a lot, I can criticize that it barely touches on what was going on in the home computer field, which although Nintendo saved the console gaming market (probably what World 1-2 will be about), home computers also saved video games and people’s interest in electronics and computers with great machines such as the Commodore 64, Atari computers, and later Commodore Amiga (much before IBM clones and DOS become popular).

Getting back to what makes World 1-1 so great, the film has many great interviews with not just most of the important people that worked in Atari and Activision but also many interviews by people who work in Microsoft (and other important companies) and many famous people in the video game world such as arcade specialists and many of what I consider to be experts in video game history. This movie is like entering a time machine and seeing what it was actually like to have worked at Atari. There are many great stories of crazy things that would happen or also recollections describing how many breakthroughs came about. Some of the interviews also talk about the important business decisions that took place both from the managerial perspective and how the engineers and the rest of the employees responded to such decisions. Just like everything in life all things must come to an end and the movie deals with the death of the original Atari corporation in a very classy and dignified manner.

I highly recommend you view the movie as part of what I call some of the best movies and shows in video game, internet, hacker, and computer history such as: Pirates of Silicon Valley, Micro Men, Middle Men, The King of Kong, The Social Network, TRON, Takedown, Silicon Valley, and Halt And Catch Fire. World 1-1 and those shows and movies are what I call to be essential to watch if you a true interest in video game history. Chances are that if you’re reading this you already have such an interest.

You can buy the movie directly from the creators’ website or you can even get it over at Steam.

If I have to give the movie a numerical score I would say it’s a 9.5 out of 10. Stop reading this and go watch it NOW! 🙂

Here is an interview we did with the creators from when they were trying to get the funding for the film:

Here is a further interview we did after it got funded. It talks more about the making of the film:

All Atari Consoles and Computers

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All Atari Consoles and Computers

You can never get enough information and pictures of Atari computers right, am I right guys! Well here we have Imgur user zadoc with a information and images on all the Atari console and computer systems. It’s like porn for classic computer geeks like me!

Here is a sample.

1975 – Home Pong

Home Pong

Pong has a long history going back before the 1972 release of the arcade version which popularized video games. “Home Pong” is a game changer in the home console market, previously occupied by only the Magnavox Odyssey. Unlike Odyssey, this game has a microchip; it’s a computer and can keep score. Pong was ready to go in 1974, actually, but Atari could not find anyone to sell it. People thought it was too expensive and no one would want to play it.

After a year Atari agreed to let Sears sell it through their sporting goods catalog. That’s why the first version of Home Pong carries the Sears Tele-Games brand. In 1976 Atari was able to release it under their own brand, and that’s the version pictured here. Between 1976 and 1977 several variations of Pong consoles would be released by Atari.

Pong Doubles, Super Pong, Super Pong Pro-Am, Super Pong Pro-Am Ten, Ultra Pong, and Ultra Pong Doubles. All are variants on Pong, some are up to four players. It would not only be Atari to release a slew of Pong consoles.

Aside from 1972’s Magnavox Odyssey, the entire first generation of video game consoles would be almost nothing but dedicated consoles. Magnavox made a slew of Odyssey models, Coleco made numerous models, as did APF, and dozens of companies you’ve never eve heard of. The craze ended in the first video game crash, as everyone got sick of these things and it became apparent that “programmable” consoles were the future. We’ll look at non-pong dedicated consoles that Atari released, but not every single Pong variant.

Check out the rest here – All Atari Consoles and Computers